My husband removed my womb without my knowledge – wife tells…

first_imgA housewife on Thursday asked an Ibadan Customary Court to dissolve her five-year-old marriage because her husband rendered her barren by conniving with doctors to remove her womb without her consent.“My lord, Musiliu has systematically rendered me barren because I can no longer conceive due to the removal of my womb during a cesarean surgery when I was trying to deliver my first child. While in the hospital, he should have informed any of my relatives that for me to have a safe delivery, my womb must be removed,” she said.She claims that it was until recently that she got to know what her husband did behind her back after he she visited a clinic for family planning, following her husbands’ directive, only for the medical personnel to inform her that she had no womb.“Worst still, Musiliu is a drunkard and insensitive in all aspect of life”, agency report quotes Kafilat as telling the court, sitting in Ile Tuntun area of Ibadan.However, Musiliu Raji, who opposed the divorce, did not deny the allegation leveled against him but pleaded with the court to help keep his relationship with Kafilat.“My lord, it is true that her womb was removed but the doctor informed me that her womb had already been damaged and the only option was total removal for her safe delivery. The doctor also advised me not to let her know until over a year when she could bear the pain”, said Musiliu who lives with Kafilat at Ologuneru area of Ibadan.Dissolving the marriage, the court President, Mr Henric Agbaje, held that it was clear that there was no more love between the couple.He awarded custody of their four-year-old son to Kafilat and directed Musiliu to provide N4,000 monthly allowance for his upkeep in addition to being responsible for the child’s education.(Breaking Times)last_img read more

Uganda’s isolated patient tests negative for Ebola

first_imgonline image online imageUganda breathes a sigh of relief after results of a patient put on isolation come out negative for Ebola.“While this is good news, both health workers and the population should be on the alert,” said Dr Paul Onek, Gulu District health officer.The World Health Organisation (WHO) and Uganda’s Ministry of Health yesterday ruled out Ebola after blood samples from the suspected patient tested negative at the Uganda Virus Research Institute (UVRI), reports the Daily Monitor.“The results for the sample from Lacor Hospital are negative for the Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers: Ebola, Marburg, CCHF, RVF and Sosuga,” said Mr Innocent Komakech, WHO’s officer in charge of Disease Outbreak, Emergency and Preparedness.WHO will maintain close links with Gulu District in northern Uganda to facilitate preparedness and readiness to respond in case of occurrences.A woman was isolated in Uganda’s St Mary’s Hospital Lacor on Saturday after she developed symptoms similar to those of Ebola.Our first diagnosis was sepsis, but we needed to be very sure because it had turned out severe. The patient was bleeding a lot and we had to isolate her and take her blood sample to UVRI for confirmation whether it was Haemorrhagic fever or not,” said Dr Emmanuel Ochola, an epidemiologist at the hospital.The doctor further said that although the patient is doing better, she will continue her recuperation in isolation.last_img read more

Nigerian government deploys special police force after clashes in Kaduna state

first_imgA member of security forces stands guard outside a court in the northern city of Kaduna, Nigeria October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Afolabi Sotunde A member of security forces stands guard outside a court in the northern city of Kaduna, Nigeria October 4, 2018. REUTERS/Afolabi SotundeThe Nigerian government has deployed a special police force to Kaduna State following the killing of 55 people since Thursday last week.This comes just a day after the Kaduna state government imposed a 24 hour curfew in an effort of restoring clam in the northern state.Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari through a post on Twitter condemned the killings adding that the Special Intervention Force would be deployed to flash points.“The disregard for the sanctity of human life is unacceptable. Violence is an ill-wind that blows nobody any good. I appeal to community leaders and citizens to always choose dialogue, patience and tolerance, to prevent crises from escalating into violence,” President Buhari said.The disregard for the sanctity of human life is unacceptable. Violence is an ill-wind that blows nobody any good. I appeal to community leaders and citizens to always choose dialogue, patience and tolerance, to prevent crises from escalating into violence.— Muhammadu Buhari (@MBuhari) October 21, 2018Reuters reports that the violence in the state capital follows clashes between two communities in the Kasuwan Magani area of southern Kaduna which left 55 dead.Police said the special force will carry out stop and search patrols, raid suspected criminal hideouts and make arrests in areas that have been flashpoints or considered to be at risk of violence.Buhari said the government would coordinate its works in the region with that of the Kaduna State Government to enhance security.“The Federal Government and its law enforcement agencies will work with the State Government and community leaders to ensure the full restoration of peace and security,” he said in his Twitter post.Clashes along ethnic lines have plagued southern Kaduna in the last few years. Last year troops and additional police officers were deployed to the state in response to an outbreak of violence.Related South Africa Police Force learns Mandarin Angolan police foil anti-government protestscenter_img Nigerian government recovers more looted fundslast_img read more

Egypt’s Sisi appoints close military ally as transport minister

first_imgEgypt Mulls Military Intervention in Libya Egypt: One Year Under Sisi FILE PHOTO: Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi attends a summit between Arab league and European Union member states, in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, February 24, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany/File Photo Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi appointed military General Kamel al-Wazir as transport minister on Sunday, after the previous minister resigned following a train crash that left more than 20 dead at Cairo’s main station last month.FILE PHOTO: Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi attends a summit between Arab league and European Union member states, in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, February 24, 2019. REUTERS/Mohamed Abd El Ghany/File PhotoWazir serves as head of the Armed Forces Engineering Authority, one of the main owners of the new administrative capital being built outside Cairo and a developer of large infrastructure and national projects commissioned by Sisi.The previous minister, Hisham Arafat, stepped down immediately after the Feb. 27 crash, in which a locomotive smashed through station buffers and burst into flames, killing at least 22 and injuring dozens.“When this (the accident) happened, we said the person who will take over (the ministry) is Kamel al-Wazir,” Sisi said during a seminar organised by the armed forces to celebrate martyrs’ day.Sisi told Wazir, who frequently appears alongside the president at public events, that he can call upon any support he needs to revamp the rail system from all state institutions, including the military.“If you want [military] officers from the vehicles administration, the armoured vehicles [administration] or the engineers .. I don’t have a problem,” he said, as he turned to Defence Minister Mohamed Zaki, who was also on stage along with the speaker of parliament.He then promoted Wazir from major general to lieutenant general, pinning new epaulettes on his uniform.The appointment is part of what analysts say is a broader trend to expand the role of the military since Sisi led the 2013 military overthrow of Egypt’s first freely-elected president, Mohamed Mursi of the Muslim Brotherhood.Parliament is currently debating proposed constitutional changes that could allow Sisi to stay in power until 2034 and tighten his control over the judiciary.The changes include amending article 200 of the constitution to add that the military has a duty to protect “the constitution and democracy and the fundamental makeup of the country and its civil nature”.The military’s economic and civilian activities have expanded since Sisi became president in 2014, and companies owned by the military have flourished, causing concern amongst local businessmen and foreign investors.“This trend is rooted in the claim that the military is uniquely capable of delivering results,” said Timothy Kaldas, non-resident fellow at the Tahrir Institute for Middle East Policy.“(This), in turn, justifies the military’s expanding control over state institutions and participation in the economy as its businesses and enterprises continue to grow and diversify,” he added.Relatedcenter_img Egypt transport minister resigns after train crash kills 25last_img read more

2016 Olympic silver medalist Eunice Kirwa banned for doping

first_imgFILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics – Athletics – Women’s Marathon – Sambodromo – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – 14/08/2016. Bahrain’s Eunice Jepkirui Kirwa celebrates after finishing second at the Women’s Marathon during the athletics event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Sambodromo in Rio de Janeiro on August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonannes Eisele/Pool FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS/File Photo FILE PHOTO: 2016 Rio Olympics – Athletics – Women’s Marathon – Sambodromo – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – 14/08/2016. Bahrain’s Eunice Jepkirui Kirwa celebrates after finishing second at the Women’s Marathon during the athletics event at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at Sambodromo in Rio de Janeiro on August 14, 2016. REUTERS/Jonannes Eisele/PoolThe Athletics Integrity Unit on Monday announced that Kenyan-born Bahraini runner Eunice Jepkirui Kirwa had been banned for four years after she tested positive for the prohibited substance Erythropoietin (EPO).The AIU says Kirwa, a silver medalist at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in the women’s marathon, did not have a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) permitting the use of EPO.35-year-old Kirwa’s ban begins from May 7, 2019 and all her results since April 1, 2019 have been disqualified. She is consequently required to forfeit any titles, awards, medals, points and prize and appearance money.The AIU says Kirwa underwent an out-of-competition doping control in Kapsabet, Kenya on April 1 2019. Her sample showed positive results for EPO resulting in a provisional suspension pending resolution of her case.The AIU says Kirwa stated that she did not dope intentionally and could only assume that the EPO entered her body through contamination during a caudal epidural injection she received in late March. Kirwa did not request analysis of her B Sample.EPO is a peptide hormone that is produced naturally by the human body. EPO is released from the kidneys and acts on the bone marrow to stimulate red blood cell production. An increase in red blood cells improves the amount of oxygen that the blood can carry to the body’s muscles.EPO was banned as a performance enhancing substance in the early 1990s.The World Anti-Doping Agency says the misuse of EPO can lead to serious health risks for athletes who use it simply to gain a competitive edge.Last week, Kenyan long-distance runner and 2016 Singapore Marathon champion Felix Kirwa was banned for nine months after testing positive for a banned substance, Strychnine.Related Kenyan marathoner Felix Kirwa banned for 9 months for doping Kenya could be banned from Rio games over doping allegationscenter_img Ethiopian Athletes address doping allegationslast_img read more

South Sudan begins 100 day countdown to new governmnet

first_imgSouth Sudan Stalemate Kenya begins withdrawing troops from South Sudan South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir (2nd R) and opposition leader Riek Machar (2nd L) shake hands after talks on proposed unity government with Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni (R) and President of Sudan’s Transitional Council Abdel Fattah al-Burhan (not in picture) at State House in Entebbe, on November 7, 2019. PHOTO | MICHAEL O’HAGAN | AFP South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir (2nd R) and opposition leader Riek Machar (2nd L) shake hands after talks on proposed unity government with Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni (R) and President of Sudan’s Transitional Council Abdel Fattah al-Burhan (not in picture) at State House in Entebbe, on November 7, 2019. PHOTO | MICHAEL O’HAGAN | AFPThe countdown to 100 days for South Sudan’s anticipated Transitional Government of National Unity is set to start this Tuesday, with key focus being on the two main political protagonists—President Salva Kiir and his former deputy Riek Machar.The two are expected to resolve a raft of issues that have, for yet another time, prevented the formation of the transitional government.Top on the agenda is the issue of security for political leaders, establishment of a functioning barracks for soldiers, merger and training of the army from the splinter armed groups as well as addressing the contentious issue of the number of states in the country and their boundaries.President Kiir and Dr Machar agreed at a Thursday meeting in Uganda to delay the planned Government of National Unity by three months from November 12, providing relief and hope that the violence that has plagued the country will subside.Machar had asked for a six-month extension, but will now have to work within the compromise timeline.“The meeting noted the incomplete critical tasks related to the security arrangements and governance, including the formation of the revitalised Transitional Government of National Unity,” stated a communique released after the Uganda State House meeting in Entebbe.Relatedcenter_img UK to send extra 100 soldiers to South Sudanlast_img read more

Moroccans caught in public without COVID-19 masks could face jail time

first_imgMorocco imposed a public health state of emergency on March 19, confining everyone to their homes except those with a permit to be out and about for their work. The decision was announced late Monday after a government meeting on how to control the epidemic.A pharmacist wears a mask next to a door covered in plastic to avoid contamination in Casablanca, Morocco, Friday, March 27, 2020.AP Photo Eritrea confirms four more COVID-19 cases Police, security agents and soldiers in armoured cars have been deployed around the country, erecting road barriers and control points.The official number of COVID-19 cases in Morocco has doubled in a week to 1,120, including 80 fatalities. Roger Mbassa Ndine, mayor of the Cameroonian coastal city of Douala, made a similar announcement on Monday as crews began distributing washable masks to citizens in a new awareness campaign.Nemache Celestin, a Douala teacher, welcomes Ndine’s decision to make wearing a mask compulsory.“Cameroon and Africa do not have enough resources to deal with this pandemic,” she said. “Everyone must do everything to protect us from the pandemic.”In recent days, police in Cameroon began arresting people who ignored measures aimed at curtailing the spread of the coronavirus.Despite government warnings, officials say a majority of Cameroonians are not taking the coronavirus seriously, and authorities are taking steps to enforce social distancing rules. Wearing face masks in public will be obligatory in Morocco from Tuesday in a bid to stem the spread of coronavirus, according to an official decree. Related Guinea reports six new COVID-19 cases including minister of public works Togo confirms first COVID-19 caselast_img read more

Rwandan police arrest 1,400 people for violating COVID-19 curfew

first_imgA pedestrian crosses a road in downtown Kigali, Rwanda, on March 22, 2020. Rwanda has announced stricter measures to be implemented for the next two weeks in a bid to contain the spread of coronavirus,PHOTO/East African FILE PHOTO: A pedestrian crosses a road in downtown Kigali, Rwanda. PHOTO/The East AfricanA total of 1,400 people have been arrested in Rwanda’s capital city of Kigali for violating a curfew aimed at curbing the spread of COVID-19, the police said on Wednesday.On Monday, the country imposed a curfew, preventing people from going out from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m. local time.The people arrested, including motorists and pedestrians, were still outside during the curfew, police spokesperson John Bosco Kabera said in an interview with Rwanda Television.The arrested people were taken to different sports stadiums in the city for questioning, and those with reasonable reasons like coming from hospitals or attending emergencies would be free, while others with invalid excuses would be fined or given warnings, he said.Kabera warned the public against breaching the restrictions imposed by the government to fight the pandemic.The Rwandan health ministry on Wednesday evening said the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached 268, while the number of recoveries rose to 130.Related Rwandan businessman hopes China will overcome COVID-19 Somalia imposes curfew to curb COVID-19 pandemiccenter_img Rwandan police to strictly enforce COVID-19 lockdownlast_img read more

Namibia’s living museums face uncertain future amid COVID-19 pandemic

first_imgNamibia halts mining operations amid COVID-19 pandemic Namibia COVID-19 cases breach 1,000 mark Namibia records first COVID-19 deathcenter_img Mafwe Living Museum.The Mafwe present their old, almost forgotten culture. (Image Courtsey of Museums Association of Namibia)The outbreak of COVID-19 has put the existence of Namibia’s living museums in jeopardy as they struggle to stay-afloat with no income coming in from international tourists.Just like all country’s in the world, Namibia’s tourism sector has been affected by the outbreak of COVID-19 with zero international tourists since March.This has affected the country’s living museums which get about 96 percent of income from international tourists.Elizabeth Yalezo has been part of the Mafwe Living Museum in the northern Zambezi region for the past 10 years teaching tourists about the local silozi culture.She made a commitment to uproot her family and live at the museum doing what she loves but the outbreak of COVID-19 is threatening her livelihood.“We have had no income for the past four months, we are hungry,” Yalezo said.Previously when Namibia’s tourism industry was booming, the museum would sometimes make over a 100,000 Namibian dollars (about 5,682 U.S. dollars) a month, which would be shared among the 45 members.“We used to make a lot of money but once it is shared between all the members it is not a lot. Unfortunately we have not been able to build up reserves in previous years. we have all been surviving from hand to mouth, thus we are starving at the moment,” she said.The Namibian government gave aid of 750 Namibian dollars to Namibians who lost their jobs because of COVID-19 but unfortunately this was not applicable to communal projects.The situation has been made worse because even though local tours were allowed after the countrywide lockdown, the Namibian economy is so weakened that there are hardly any people travelling.“If we were at least getting local visitors it would have been better but there are no visitors coming. We really need assistance,” Yalezo said.The living museums in Namibia are exceptional traditional projects where visitors can learn about the cultures of the different tribes in the country.The museums were established with the aim of preserving the country’s traditional culture while also fighting poverty in rural areas through income generated from the museums.At the living museums, tourists get a chance to experience interactive learning of different Namibian cultures where they live at the museums for a couple of days seeing how the tribes live their lives.According to a representative from Namibia Living Culture Foundation Sebastian Durrschmidt, the living museums have done very well for surrounding communities in terms of income generation and exposure.He said, the museums are the only employers in the six villages where they were developed and the loss of income also means a subsequent collapse of all income for the remaining village communities.“Over 2,000 lives are at risk of losing income and their livelihoods. The living museums are at the brink of collapsing if tourism does not start soon,” Durrschmidt added.Statistics from the Living Culture Foundation show that during 2017 and 2018 when Namibia’s tourism was at its peak, all six living museums were visited by about 30,000 tourists.“A high number of visitors means a good income for the communal living museums. The income will not only provide food security but also school fees. Some invest in livestock and vegetable gardens,” Durrschmidt said.Rimunatavi Tjipurua, a manager at the Ovahimba Living Museum, said life at the communal museum had become unbearable and sad.Namibia this month opened its borders to international tourists but with the surge in cases where the country recorded over 1, 000 positive cases in just two weeks, the tourism sector is doubtful that tourism will pick up anytime soon.The country has far recorded 2,802 COVID-19 cases and 16 deaths.Relatedlast_img read more

South Africa’s Eskom halts power cuts after recovering three coal units

first_imgSouth Africa’s Eskom chair resigns after power cuts South Africa’s Eskom extends power cuts into Monday South Africa’s Eskom resumes power cutscenter_img FILE PHOTO: Men walk past electricity pylons as they return from work in Orlando, Soweto township, South Africa March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko/File Photo FILE PHOTO: Men walk past electricity pylons as they return from work in Orlando, Soweto township, South Africa March 18, 2019. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko/File PhotoSouth Africa’s Eskom has suspended planned power cuts, after returning to service overnight three generating units at coal-fired power stations, the state utility said on Friday.More power cuts had been due on Friday in addition to three on consecutive days this week, but supply constraints had eased following the recovery of units at the Lethabo, Medupi and Kusile plants, the ailing utility said in a statement.Unplanned breakdowns stand at 8,750 megawatts (MW), out of Eskom’s nominal capacity of 44,000 MW, compared to breakdowns of more than 11,900 MW at one stage on Tuesday.Eskom’s struggles to power Africa’s most industrialised nation are one of the main obstacles to economic growth.“Any significant deterioration in the generation performance may necessitate the implementation of loadshedding at short notice,” Eskom said, referring to the planned power cuts.Relatedlast_img read more