Depressed People Find It Hard to Stop Reliving Bad Times

first_imgMSN Health:June 7 (HealthDay News) — A new study suggests that depressed people suffer from an inability to rid themselves of negative thoughts because they can’t turn their attention to other things.“They basically get stuck in a mindset where they relive what happened to them over and over again,” said study co-author Jutta Joormann of the University of Miami in an Association for Psychological Science news release. “Even though they think, ‘Oh, it’s not helpful, I should stop thinking about this, I should get on with my life,’ they can’t stop doing it.”The study authors gave tests designed to gauge mental flexibility to 26 depressed people and 27 people who had never been depressed. They looked at words on a screen for one second each and then were told to remember them in forward or backward order. Then they were asked to look at individual words and say where they were in the original order.Read the whole story: MSN Health More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

Stress Turns Men Into Social Butterflies

first_imgLiveScience:When stress strikes, women are said to turn to their social ties for support, while men are supposed to become aggressive. But new research finds that these gender stereotypes don’t always hold true.…In fact, men under stress are more likely to trust others, behave in a trustworthy manner and to share resources, a new study finds.Earlier research has suggested that when under stress, men take a “fight-or-flight” approach, becoming more aggressive, while women are more likely to “tend-and-befriend,” reaching out to others.Read the whole story: LiveSciencelast_img read more

Studying for a big exam? Use flash cards, not highlighters

first_imgMilwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel: Students studying for big exams may want to put down their neon highlighters and make some flash cards instead.Some of the most popular study strategies — such as highlighting and rereading — don’t show much promise for improving student learning, according to a new report published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.While 10 learning techniques commonly used by students and researched in the report vary widely in effectiveness, two strategies — practice testing and distributed practice — made the grade, receiving the highest overall rating.Practice testing involves using flash cards or answering questions at the end of a textbook chapter. Distributed practice is the opposite of last-minute cramming, spreading out studying over time and quizzing yourself on material long before the big test.Read the whole story: Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinellast_img read more

ADHD Drugs Don’t Boost Kids’ Grades

first_imgThe Wall Street Journal: It’s no longer shocking to hear of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder—and others simply facing a big test—taking ADHD medicine to boost their performance in school. But new studies point to a problem: There’s little evidence that the drugs actually improve academic outcomes.Stimulants used to treat ADHD like Ritalin and Adderall are sometimes called “cognitive enhancers” because they have been shown in a number of studies to improve attention, concentration and even certain types of memory in the short-term. Similar drugs were given to World War II soldiers to improve their ability to stay alert while scanning radars for enemy aircraft.…Martha Farah, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania who sits on the American Academy of Neurology committee that is drafting new treatment guidelines, recalls a student saying that after she takes her medication, she heads to the library. If she keeps her head down and studies, she gets very absorbed in her work and accomplishes a tremendous amount. But if a friend stops by, she becomes equally engrossed in the chat. Many students report they find themselves absorbed in cleaning their rooms rather than studying.Read the whole story: The Wall Street Journal More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

Guys Prefer Electric Shocks to Boredom

first_imgScientific American:How often have you longed to have time to just sit quietly and think? Well, be careful what you wish for. Because a study shows that many people find such interludes incredibly unpleasant. So uncomfortable, in fact, that they would rather zap themselves with electricity than be left alone with their thoughts. The shocking results appear in the journal Science. [Timothy D. Wilson et al, Just think: The challenges of the disengaged mind]In the experiment, participants were asked to sit alone in a room for up to 15 minutes…with no cell phone, no reading material, no music—so, nothing to entertain them, save their own rambling thoughts. Afterward, most subjects reported that they found it difficult to concentrate and that they did not enjoy the experience. Read the whole story: Scientific American More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more