#AskIt – Does Walt Disney World Need More Value Resorts?

first_imgShare This!Howdy folks. This week I was looking over TouringPlans coverage of current and upcoming resorts and it really sunk in that nearly all the expansion in recent memory has been in the Deluxe and Disney Vacation Club category. Sure, there’s Art of Animation, which is sort of a Value Plus. But then there’s expansion at Coronado Springs (for more luxe rooms for convention and business guests), the Tower expansion at Caribbean Beach and the Riviera (a DVC property that will most likely be at Caribbean Beach), Copper Creek Cabins and Villas at Wilderness Lodge…and don’t forget the Star Wars resort. These are all great. Really. But sometimes, you want a cheaper room with the amenities of staying onsite.Pop Century’s rooms have gotten a nice makeover. And the rumor is that some of the All Stars will be next. But you really don’t have the number options in the value resort level that you do moderate, deluxe, and deluxe villa levels.Of course, no one is forcing you to stay onsite. And you offsite fans are a vocal if not plentiful part of our readership (no, really – we have the survey numbers to back it up – the vast majority of our readers are happily staying onsite at Walt Disney World). So if that’s your thing, you do you. But our question this week is:Does Walt Disney World Need More Value Resorts? Yes (76%, 547 Votes) No (24%, 171 Votes) Total Voters: 718  Loading …We’ll have your results next week. In the meantime, if you’d like to see a new value resort, what theme should it have? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

Motrin Bows to Social Media Pressure From Moms – Removes Controversial Ad

first_imgFacebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… One would think that few ads could be less controversial than ads for painkillers, but over the weekend, McNeil Consumer Healthcare, the maker of Motrin, found itself in the middle of a major controversy on Twitter, FriendFeed, and other social networks. Motrin’s latest ad discusses the advantages of using the painkiller for mothers who ‘wear’ their babies close to their body with a sling or other baby carriers and who might suffer from back pain because of it. A lot of mothers (and fathers) were clearly not amused by these ads and Motrin has now decided to remove them and has issued an apology.The ad, like a lot of ads, is offensive because it is boring and talks down to its target audience (and also because it stole its use of typography from a popular YouTube video (note: language in the video might be offensive to some)). Motrin clearly didn’t understand its market, but it is hard not to consider the ‘outrage’ over this video to be a bit of an overreaction as well.This affair is also a good example of how much power a vocal minority can have thanks to social media. The controversy has already gone beyond Twitter, and mainstream news outlets will surely pick this story up within the next day or two. frederic lardinois Related Posts We Feel Your PainMotrin, as Seth Godin points out, had a chance here to reconnect with its customers by using social media to reach out to them with its apology, but the company issued a standard press release-style apology on its site instead. That might seem old-fashioned, but for most companies, that’s the only way they know how to operate.Learning from ComcastMore and more users expect companies to reach out to them directly through social media, so just having a social media presence is not enough anymore. When controversies like this one happen (whether deserved or not), smart companies will reach out to consumers directly to stop these fires right where they started. A pioneer of this is obviously Comcast, whose ‘Director of Digital Care’ Frank Eliason reaches out to any and all Twitter users who tweet about issues with the company’s service. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#news#social networks#web A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins

first_img Depiction of the CSS Box Model in CSS1The four margin properties for each side of the box and the margin shorthand were all defined in CSS1.The CSS2.1 specification has an illustration to demonstrate the Box Model and also defines terms we still use to describe the various boxes. The specification describes the content box, padding box, border box, and margin box, each being defined by the edges of the content, padding, border, and margin respectively. Posted on 15th July 2019Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins Rachel Andrew 2019-07-15T12:30:59+02:00 2019-07-15T12:36:09+00:00One of the first things most of us learned when we learned CSS, was details of the various parts of a box in CSS, described as The CSS Box Model. One of the elements in the Box Model is the margin, a transparent area around a box, which will push other elements away from the box contents. The margin-top, margin-right, margin-bottom and margin-left properties were described right back in CSS1, along with the shorthand margin for setting all four properties at once.A margin seems to be a fairly uncomplicated thing, however, in this article, we will take a look at some of the things which trip people up with regard to using margins. In particular, we will be looking at how margins interact with each other, and how margin collapsing actually works.The CSS Box ModelAs with all articles about parts of the CSS Box Model, we should define what we mean by that, and how the model has been clarified through versions of CSS. The Box Model refers to how the various parts of a box — the content, padding, border, and margin — are laid out and interact with each other. In CSS1, the Box Model was detailed with the ASCII art diagram shown in the image below. DepvTools can help you see where your margin ends upOnly Block Margins CollapseThe last example also highlights something about margin collapsing. In CSS2, only vertical margins are specified to collapse — that is the top and bottom margins on an element if you are in a horizontal writing mode. So the left and right margins above are not collapsing and ending up outside the wrapper.Note: It is worth remembering that margins only collapse in the block direction, such as between paragraphs.Things Which Prevent Margin CollapsingMargins never collapse if an item has absolute positioning, or is floated. However, assuming you have run into one of the places where margins collapse outlined above, how can you stop those margins collapsing?The first thing that stops collapsing is situations where there is something between the elements in question.For example, a box completely empty of content will not collapse it’s top and bottom margin if it has a border, or padding applied. In the example below I have added 1px of padding to the box. There is now a 50-pixel margin above and below the box.See the Pen [Margins: empty boxes with padding do not collapse](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/gNeMpg) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: empty boxes with padding do not collapse by Rachel Andrew.This has logic behind it, if the box is completely empty with no border or padding, it is essentially invisible. It might be an empty paragraph element thrown into the markup by your CMS. If your CMS was adding redundant paragraph elements, you probably wouldn’t want them to cause large gaps between the other paragraphs due to their margins being honored. Add anything to the box, and you will get those gaps.Similar behavior can be seen with margins on first or last children which collapse through the parent. If we add a border to the parent, the margins on the children stay inside.See the Pen [Margins: margin on first and last child doesn’t collapse if the parent has a border](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/vqRKKX) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: margin on first and last child doesn’t collapse if the parent has a border by Rachel Andrew.Once again, there is some logic to the behavior. If you have wrapping elements for semantic purposes that do not display visually, you probably don’t want them to introduce big gaps in the display. This made a lot of sense when the web was mostly text. It is less useful as behavior when we are using elements to lay out a design.Creating a Block Formatting ContextA new Block Formatting Context (BFC) will also prevent margin collapsing through the containing element. If we look again at the example of the first and last child, ending up with their margins outside of the wrapper, and give the wrapper display: flow-root, thus creating a new BFC, the margins stay inside.See the Pen [Margins: a new Block Formatting Context contains margins](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/VJXjEp) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: a new Block Formatting Context contains margins by Rachel Andrew.To find out more about display: flow-root, read my article “Understanding CSS Layout And The Block Formatting Context”. Changing the value of the overflow property to auto will have the same effect, as this also creates a new BFC, although it may also create scrollbars that you didn’t want in some scenarios.Flex And Grid ContainersFlex and Grid containers establish Flex and Grid formatting contexts for their children, so they have different behavior to block layout. One of those differences is that margins do not collapse:“A flex container establishes a new flex formatting context for its contents. This is the same as establishing a block formatting context, except that flex layout is used instead of block layout. For example, floats do not intrude into the flex container, and the flex container’s margins do not collapse with the margins of its contents.”— Flexbox Level 1If we take the example above and make the wrapper into a flex container, displaying the items with flex=direction: column, you can see that the margins are now contained by the wrapper. Additionally, margins between adjacent flex items do not collapse with each other, so we end up with 100 pixels between flex items, the total of the 50 pixels on the top and bottom of the items.See the Pen [Margins: margins on flex items do not collapse](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/mZxreL) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: margins on flex items do not collapse by Rachel Andrew.Margin Strategies For Your SiteDue to margin collapsing, it is a good idea to come up with a consistent way of dealing with margins in your site. The simplest thing to do is to only define margins on the top or bottom of elements. In that way, you should not run into margin collapsing issues too often as the side with a margin will always be adjacent to a side without a margin.Note: Harry Roberts has an excellent post detailing the reasons why setting margins only in one direction is a good idea, and not just due to solving collapsing margin issues.This solution doesn’t solve the issues you might run into with margins on children collapsing through their parent. That particular issue tends to be less common, and knowing why it is happening can help you come up with a solution. An ideal solution to that is to give components which require it display: flow-root, as a fallback for older browsers you could use overflow to create a BFC, turn the parent into a flex container, or even introduce a single pixel of padding. Don’t forget that you can use feature queries to detect support for display: flow-root so only old browsers get a less optimal fix.Most of the time, I find that knowing why margins collapse (or didn’t) is the key thing. You can then figure out on a case-by-case basis how to deal with it. Whatever you choose, make sure to share that information with your team. Quite often margin collapsing is a bit mysterious, so the reason for doing things to counter it may be non-obvious! A comment in your code goes a long way to help — you could even link to this article and help to share the margin collapsing knowledge.I thought that I would round up this article with a few other margin-related pieces of information.Percentage MarginsWhen you use a percentage in CSS, it has to be a percentage of something. Margins (and padding) set using percentages will always be a percentage of the inline size (width in a horizontal writing mode) of the parent. This means that you will have equal-sized padding all the way around the element when using percentages.In the CodePen example below, I have a wrapper which is 200 pixels wide, inside is a box which has a 10% margin, the margin is 20 pixels on all sides, that being 10% of 200.See the Pen [Margins: percentage margins](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/orqzrP) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: percentage margins by Rachel Andrew.Margins In A Flow-Relative WorldWe have been talking about vertical margins throughout this article, however, modern CSS tends to think about things in a flow relative rather than a physical way. Therefore, when we talk about vertical margins, we really are talking about margins in the block dimension. Those margins will be top and bottom if we are in a horizontal writing mode, but would be right and left in a vertical writing mode written left to right.Once working with logical, flow relative directions it becomes easier to talk about block start and block end, rather than top and bottom. To make this easier, CSS has introduced the Logical Properties and Values specification. This maps flow relative properties onto the physical ones.For margins, this gives us the following mappings (if we are working in English or any other horizontal writing mode with a left-to-right text direction).margin-top = margin-block-startmargin-right = margin-inline-endmargin-bottom = margin-block-endmargin-left = margin-inline-startWe also have two new shorthands which allow for the setting of both blocks at once or both inline.margin-blockmargin-inlineIn the next CodePen example, I have used these flow relative keywords and then changed the writing mode of the box, you can see how the margins follow the text direction rather than being tied to physical top, right, bottom, and left.See the Pen [Margins: flow relative margins](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/BgrQRj) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: flow relative margins by Rachel Andrew.You can read more about logical properties and values on MDN or in my article “Understanding Logical Properties And Values” here on Smashing Magazine.To Wrap-UpYou now know most of what there is to know about margins! In short:Margin collapsing is a thing. Understanding why it happens and when it doesn’t will help you solve any problems it may cause.Setting margins in one direction only solves many margin related headaches.As with anything in CSS, share with your team the decisions you make, and comment your code.Thinking about block and inline dimensions rather than the physical top, right, bottom and left will help you as the web moves towards being writing mode agnostic. (il)From our sponsors: Everything You Need To Know About CSS Margins HomeWeb DesignEverything You Need To Know About CSS Marginscenter_img Depection of the CSS Box Model in CSS2There is now a Level 3 Box Model specification as a Working Draft. This specification refers back to CSS2 for the definitions of the Box Model and margins, therefore it is the CSS2 definition we will be using for the majority of this article.Margin CollapsingThe CSS1 specification, as it defined margins, also defined that vertical margins collapse. This collapsing behavior has been the source of margin-related frustration ever since. Margin collapsing makes sense if you consider that in those early days, CSS was being used as a documenting formatting language. Margin collapsing means that when a heading with a bottom margin, is followed by a paragraph with a top margin, you do not get a huge gap between those items.When margins collapse, they will combine so that the space between the two elements becomes the larger of the two margins. The smaller margin essentially ending up inside the larger one.Margins collapse in the following situations:Adjacent siblingsCompletely empty boxesParent and first or last child elementLet’s take a look at each of these scenarios in turn, before looking at the things which prevent margins from collapsing in these scenarios.Adjacent SiblingsMy initial description of margin collapsing is a demonstration of how the margins between adjacent siblings collapse. Other than in the situations mentioned below, if you have two elements displaying one after the other in normal flow, the bottom margin of the first element will collapse with the top margin of the following element.In the CodePen example below, there are three div elements. The first has a top and bottom margin of 50 pixels. The second has a top and bottom margin of 20px. The third has a top and bottom margin of 3em. The margin between the first two elements is 50 pixels, as the smaller top margin is combined with the larger bottom margin. The margin between the second two elements in 3em, as 3em is larger than the 20 pixels on the bottom of the second element.See the Pen [Margins: adjacent siblings](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/OevMPo) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: adjacent siblings by Rachel Andrew.Completely Empty BoxesIf a box is empty, then it’s top and bottom margin may collapse with each other. In the following CodePen example, the element with a class of empty has a top and bottom margin of 50 pixels, however, the space between the first and third items is not 100 pixels, but 50. This is due to the two margins collapsing. Adding anything to that box (even padding) will cause the top and bottom margins to be used and not collapse.See the Pen [Margins: empty boxes](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/JQLGMr) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: empty boxes by Rachel Andrew.Parent And First Or Last Child ElementThis is the margin collapsing scenario which catches people out most often, as it does not seem particularly intuitive. In the following CodePen, I have a div with a class of wrapper, and I have given that div an outline in red so that you can see where it is. The three child elements all have a margin of 50 pixels. However, the first and last items are flush with the edges of the wrapper; there is not a 50-pixel margin between the element and the wrapper.See the Pen [Margins: margin on first and last child](https://codepen.io/rachelandrew/pen/BgrKGp) by Rachel Andrew. See the Pen Margins: margin on first and last child by Rachel Andrew.This is because the margin on the child collapses with any margin on the parent thus ending up on the outside of the parent. You can see this if you inspect the first child using DevTools. The highlighted yellow area is the margin. Everything You Need To Know About CSS MarginsYou are here: Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019last_img read more

Annual Filing Season Program Survives AICPA Challenge

first_imgThe AICPA lost its bid to stop the IRS’s Annual Filing Season Program. The IRS created the program after losing its battle to regulate unenrolled tax preparers.Annual Filing Season ProgramThe IRS grants an annual Certificate of Completion to anyone who completes the program requirements. These include:obtaining a prearer tax identification number;taking the annual filing season refresher course or taking 18 hours of continuing education;passing an exam; andconsenting to be subject to the rules in Circular 230.As incentives for preparers to take part in the program, the IRS:lists unenrolled agents with a Certificate of Completion in its online directory of tax preparers; andgives them limited practice rights during audits of returns they prepared.Before the IRS began the Annual Filing Season Program, all unenrolled tax preparers had limited practice rights.Constitutional and Statutory StandingThe AICPA had standing to question the program because it injured some of its members. The program extends the scope of Circular 230 to unenrolled preparers, including those employed by AICPA members. Thus, it imposes new supervisory duties on AICPA members who employ preparers who complete the program. So, the AICPA had a grievance that supplied both constitutional and statutory standing.Authority for the ProgramHowever, the IRS has the statutory authority to establish and operate the program and publish its results. Contrary to the AICPA’s argument, the IRS does not tie Circular 230 violations to return preparation. Instead, it ties Circular 230 violations to the limited practice rights. Thus, the program did not run afoul of the restrictions in Loving.Also, the IRS followed the applicable procedure when it announced the program. The IRS did not have to adopt the program through notice and comment rulemaking under the APA.In addition, the program does not bind unenrolled preparers. Because the program is voluntary it provides an opportunity for those who chose to satisfy the requirements. Also, it does not impose any new or different rules upon supervisors of unenrolled preparers who do not participate in the program. .The procedure the IRS used to create the program was interpretive, not legislative, guidance. The guidance interpreted what the statute meant by competency.Also, the IRS gave unenrolled preparers limited practice rights through a revenue procedure. And, the IRS issued that procedure without notice and comment. Thus, the IRS did not violate the APA by failing to follow the notice and comment procedures.Program Not Arbitrary and CapriciousThe IRS’s Annual Filing Season program is not arbitrary and capricious. The IRS considered the AICPA’s concerns when setting up its return preparer database. Users can filter the directory to show each category of service provider. This includes those identified as Annual Filing Season Program participants.The IRS did not violate its obligations under the APA to consider reasonable alternatives to the program. The AICPA did not propose an alternative way to deal with:the problem of incompetent tax preparers; ortaxpayers who cannot tell whether an uncredentialed tax preparer is or is not competent.Reversing DC D.C., 2016-2 USTC ¶50,376.American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, CA-D.C.Other References:Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more