Columbus Catholic girls basketball comes up short against Colby

first_imgBy Paul LeckerSports ReporterMARSHFIELD — Colby outscored Marshfield Columbus Catholic by six points in the second quarter to pull ahead and held off the Dons the rest of the way, winning 40-35 in a Cloverbelt Conference East Division girls basketball game Friday night at Columbus Catholic High School.After a low-scoring first quarter, Colby used a 13-7 advantage in the second quarter to take an 18-10 lead and was able to finish off the win, sending the Dons to their third loss in a row.Abby Baierl made five 3-pointers and scored a game-high 20 points for Columbus Catholic (10-10, 7-8 Cloverbelt East).Columbus Catholic tried to get back in the game using the 3-point shot, but other than Baierl it was not very successful. The Dons were just 6 of 24 from long range with Baierl going 5 of 14. Columbus shot just 20.4 percent (11 of 54) overall from the field.Samantha Hayes scored 16 points, including eight in the decisive second quarter for Colby, who improves to 10-11 overall and finish its Cloverbelt East schedule with a 10-6 record and a fourth-place finish in the standings.Columbus Catholic wraps up its conference schedule Monday at Gilman and will host the fifth-place game in the Cloverbelt East-West crossovers on Thursday against a team yet to be determined. Monday’s game will broadcast on WDLB-AM 1450 and wdlbwosq.com at 7:30 p.m.(Hub City Times Sports Reporter Paul Lecker is also the publisher of MarshfieldAreaSports.com.)Hornets 40, Dons 35Colby 5 13 13 9 – 40Columbus Catholic 3 7 12 13 – 35COLBY (40): Haylee Geiger 3 2-2 9, Hannah Gurtner 0 2-8 2, Jordyn Halopka 0 0-0 0, Jenna Jicinsky 3 1-2 7, Neilanna Gotz 0 4-8 4, Paige Brueswitz 0 0-0 0, Kendra Bellendorf 1 0-0 2, Samantha Hayes 8 0-0 16. FG: 15. FT: 9-20. 3-pointers: 1 (Geiger 1). Fouls: 10. Fouled out: none. Record: 10-11, 10-6 Cloverbelt Conference East Division.COLUMBUS CATHOLIC (35): Meena Thill 1-3 0-0 2, Alexandra Hutchison 0-7 0-0 0, Alishia Reigel 0-4 0-2 0, Kendra Baierl 0-0 0-0 0, Jess Trad 2-14 2-2 7, Abby Baierl 6-18 3-4 20, Natalie Pospyhalla 0-2 0-0 0, Hannah Stratman 2-6 2-4 6, Marissa Immerfall 0-0 0-0 0. FG: 11-54. FT: 7-12. 3-pointers: 6-24 (A. Baierl 5-14, Trad 1-8, Pospyhalla 0-2). Reboudns: 21 (Stratman 5, A. Baierl 5). Record: 10-10, 7-8 Cloverbelt Conference East Division.last_img read more

How Zimbra Went From Web 2.0 Poster Child to $350M Yahoo! Acquisition, in 2 Years!

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Analysis#web Last week Read/WriteWeb editor Richard MacManus interviewed Satish Dharmaraj, Zimbra co-founder and CEO. The result is a 30 minute podcast available on Read/WriteTalk (transcript included). The following post is highlights from the discussion, which focused on Zimbra’s journey from October 2005 Web 2.0 Conference launch to September 2007 acquisition by Yahoo! for $350M.In September 2007 Web Office startup Zimbra was acquired by Yahoo! for $350M. As I noted at the time, it seems like only yesterday that Zimbra was the buzz of the 2005 Web Conference (which incidentally was the first Silicon Valley conference I attended). Yet in just under 2 years from launching, Zimbra went from Web Office poster child (one of them at any rate) to a company worth $350 million. How did it happen? What lessons can aspiring entrepreneurs learn from Zimbra, as they attempt to create a multi-million dollar business too? For me there was only one way to find out: interview Satish Dharmaraj, Zimbra co-founder and CEO.The entire interview is up on our podcast show, Read/WriteWeb. Here are some of my favorite bits:Question: who came up with the idea for Zimbra and when did that happen?Satish: “While we were brainstorming on ideas – and we cycled through a lot of them – we always kept coming back to: What are the big things that people do on a computer? Well, they search and they web browse and they read email. We started believing that people spend more time on email than search or web browsing, and so we said, ‘Man, that’s huge.’ It seems so evident but that was basically the genesis. Well Google is tackling search and, obviously, Firefox and IE are tackling the web browsing issue, and then we have Outlook or Thunderbird or Entourage for email. Well, that seems really broken. […]Then at the same time, we were thinking about technologies and how the web browser is becoming the predominant platform of modern day computing. Do we really need to have a desktop app and can we do everything on the server side? That’s something to break into.”Question: […] What was the initial reaction to the product when you launched in October of 2005?Satish: “Peoples reactions to it was unanimously: ‘I can’t believe this is a web browser. I can’t believe that this can be done all inside of Ajax and all with a server that’s not hosted or with data that resided remotely.’ Our goal was to basically blow the pants away of Outlook or any other client in terms of user interactivity, even though it was inside of a web browser. I think when we launched, we successfully got that kind of a reaction from people who were just totally wowed with it. They were all extremely excited that somebody was putting up such a huge and competitive product in the mail landscape which people had thought had been written off.Then, for us, we knew in our hearts, and we didn’t want to be a web 2.0 company that’s just all hype and glam. We knew that we had planned all of this carefully with our board. We had always wanted to start making money. It has happened. As soon as we launched in October, back before we started making money, before we sold to Yahoo, we were handsomely cash flow positive. So we’re always proud of what we went through as a company: got a lot of bugs, got a great product but at the end of the day, we were making money. That was basically the difference that set us apart.”Question: One thing that web 2.0 critics often derive about the current generation of web apps is that they are features and not businesses. Also, the web 2.0 startups have too large a reliance on M&A as the end goal. This is something we constantly hear from critics of web 2.0. Zimbra was obviously a very successful buyout. Was that your plan from the start or did you start out with the aim of being a viable standalone business? Back in October of 2005, what was your end goal for Zimbra at that point?Satish: “Honestly, I can say this. We set out to build a great company with a real business behind it. That’s what I think people should do when they start a business. They [have] got to think about: How do I make this an independently successful cash flow self-sustaining business? Then, there’ll be very interesting M&A opportunities that will come and knock on the door. If instead we started a company thinking that there is going to be a quick flip, [in] 90% of the cases that does not work out because no one is interested in buying – or they want to buy you off really cheap. We were not thinking of an ideal nor were we thinking of an M&A. We were just thinking: Let’s go and create a compelling product and create some real business in specific markets. That’s what we started out to do and that’s what we did.”Listen to the full podcast for more insight into the growth of Zimbra and some of the tactics they employed to build their ultimately successful web 2.0 business. richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

Completing Loss Prevention Courses for Certification Drives Results

first_imgWeston Pate, LPCThe decision to pursue LPQ or LPC certification through the Loss Prevention Foundation means that soon you will be able to achieve better results in your organization and in your professional life. But between that decision and the credential after your name lies just a little work in the form of comprehensive loss prevention courses.Weston Pate, LPC, zone manager, asset and profit protection for Kmart, knows how much hard work must go into the LPC curriculum. In the recent Certification column in the September-October issue of LP Magazine, Pate shares his experience as a working LP professional who elected to pursue certification. In the column, Pate talks about the benefits he has seen on an organizational and personal level since taking the course:“I think that one of the biggest benefits I have seen is the ability to speak to certain parts of the business better, such as supply chain, and I also have seen interest from my peers and my direct reports now that they see the LPC credential on my signature. I believe this has been a great benefit because if others take the course, then they too will be better equipped to drive better results.”Pate also points out how comprehensive the loss prevention courses in the certification process are:- Sponsor – “It’s very comparable to my college coursework and takes the same level of discipline and self-motivation to complete. This is something that you have to motivate yourself to do, and the feeling you get once you have completed the coursework and final exam is amazing.”Check out “Drive Better Results in Your Company and Career” to read the full column and learn how the certification process can change the way an LP professional approaches his job. You can also visit the Table of Contents for the September-October 2016 issue or register for a free subscription to the magazine. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

If Clayton Christiansen were running Apple Computer, then…

first_imgAs a follow-up to my last article on the decentralization of the economy from one of a relatively large number of very large businesses and a relatively few number of small businesses to a relatively few number of very large businesses and a very large number of small businesses. As you may recall, I talked about how the advent of networks (railroad->telephone->highway->airline->fax->email->internet) has overall lowered the “transaction costs” between businesses which increases the likelihood of a decision to outsource a task versus hire additional employees leading to an overall economic decentralization. One of the problems with this model is that it’s a bit hard to know where your industry is in it’s development. For example, Apple has been earning huge profits on its itunes/ipod business for several years now — are there many more years to come or are they facing near-term de-centralization as the buying criteria shifts from simplicity to something else (i.e. price, features, other)? It is likely doing its best to keep the interfaces between the pieces of the value chain locked up (trade secrets, patents, exclusivity with parts suppliers, etc.) and keep customers locked in, but how long can they hold on? At some point in time, there may be another disruption in the computer industry that will cause it to consolidate again. For example, the buying criterion moving to a new price point to serve underdeveloped countries might end up creating a new integrated player in the pc space who controls the boundaries of a new device that can be sold for $100 or less. I suspect that we will see a similar decentralization in the online music industry. Just as they did in the PC industry 20 years ago while the category was in the “not good enough” phase, Apple has seized control of the subsections/interfaces between the components within the mp3 player (ipod), the music delivery application (itunes), the music itself, and the distribution (Apple stores). As they did with the pc, they are optimizing around the buying criteria of ease of use because prior to ipod/itunes, “you’d have to be a high school student” [I borrowed that line from Christiansen] to figure out how to make this type of stuff work. By not having to worry about designing the boundaries (api’s), Apple lowers its “transaction costs” and can innovate quickly. We are still in the early phase of this industry and Apple is earning the lion’s share of the profits. It will be interesting to see who the winners are as the industry decentralizes. In particular, it will be interesting to see how Microsoft’s strategy plays out. From my perspective, Microsoft is making a mistake by trying to play the same game as Apple here and controlling the end-to-end experience, rather than sticking to it’s knitting and trying to control a strategic layer that enables this industry to split apart. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Today, I want to talk a bit about centralization/decentralization within industries. I think Clayton Christiansen does a pretty good job of explaining the centralization/decentralization of industries and where the profits flow in the value chain depending on where the cycle is. Basically, his thesis is that vertically integrated firms take the lion’s share of the profit in an industry when the products are not that good (i.e. pre-chasm). They generally have a big advantage because they do not have to worry about defining boundaries (i.e. api’s) between subsections of their products and can just focus on innovating. This is something that Apple has proven they are exceptionally good at. They first proved it with the PC back in the 1980’s where they controlled the subcomponents including the operating system and while the industry was in its infancy, it accrued major profits on Mac’s using that integrated approach. As the industry matured, the buying criteria started changing to price and the “boundaries” between the subsections were detailed sending the profits away from independent architecture providers like Apple to multiple tiers in the value chain, such as Microsoft, Intel, memory companies, disk drive companies, etc. It is probably helpful to think a bit about what’s happening in your industry? Are the profits centralized around integrators of functionality? Are the boundaries between the subsections of your industry starting to break down? Is there reason to believe that a disrupter could be coming along at the low end? The following is Christiansen’s specific take on the how the value chain in the computer industry has changed. It is most interesting to see how much the industry has decentralized over time and how the profits now accrue to the subsections in the value chain versus the integrated suppliers, such as Apple. Originally published Feb 13, 2007 11:50:00 AM, updated July 11 2013last_img read more

HubSpot TV – Vanity and Branding on Facebook with Special Guest Jeff Taylor

first_imgEpisode #44 – June 12th, 2009 (Episode Length: 32 minutes, 36 second) Blog article: http://itunes.hubspot.tv to learn how to create a thriving blog. @ Names based on your page or personal name, no “generic” words allowed ) : Get your darn Facebook URL tonight at midnight! Closing Coming Soon: Facebook Usernames Inbound Marketing University ! (Starts next Monday.) FAQ: Learn how to build your business blog into an inbound marketing machine. Facebook Goes In-Vain DJ on the side! Eons.com Marketing Takeaway Originally published Jun 13, 2009 9:15:00 AM, updated July 04 2013 Remember to subscribe in iTunes: Headlines Marketing Takeaway Doing It Right Blog article:  Many Twitter “accounts” are actually not that active: Inboundmarketing.com Announcing the June 2009 State of the Twittersphere Report Twitter Scavenger Hunt Meets Gossip Girl How to interact on Twitter: @ : New site where you can post questions, learn about inbound marketing, meet others, find and post jobs or sign up for World’s Largest Twitter Study by HubSpot Reports Over Half of Accounts Don’t Tweet Vacant Homes in Twitterville Contextweb Facebook (finally!) allows simple “vanity” URLs for profiles and pages (not groups) Download the free webinar Now at News release: asks, “How do you measure the effectiveness of public speaking engagements?  How do you measure an ROI?” , a social network for baby boomerscenter_img Facebook Usernames Coming Soon for Pages Announcement: Authenticity vs. Authority 55% of accounts are not following anyone Marketing Tip of the Week Battle of the Search Engine Marketing Fox Fever Forum Fodder : Publish interesting data in order to get PR. : Authenticity with gain you authority, which is what you need to worry about as a marketer. www.inboundmarketing.com/forum : Today’s big brands are being built with inbound marketing. The “buzz” has driven a lot of tire kickers to Twitter, more than passionate users. Google & Firefox have gone inbound with user generated content and creating a buzz: Intro mvolpe Bing is going outbound with the marketing blitz Special Guest: Jeff Taylor, Monster.com & Eons.com Mailbag Founder, CEO and Chief Monster of 55% of users have never tweeted Authenticity vs. Authority Nobody Recognizes The Chrome Icon, So Google Wants You To Make A Video About It (To ask a question that you’d like to appear in Forum Fodder, visit Lots of coverage in GigaOm, SF Chronicle, VentureBeat, NECN, Seattle Post Intelligencer, Monster.com Aquick question; if I embed a video from youtube on our website; do thewebsite video views get counted towards the youtube page total views? Marketing Takeaway 53% of users have no followers : Tonight at midnight, get your Facebook vanity URL! No cheating – business page must be from before May 31 and have 1,000+ fans Marketing Takeaway Webinar: Advanced Business Blogging Ken Lauher of karenrubin HubSpot released our second report on Twitter – “State of the Twittersphere – June 2009” SethGodin: “If it’s a word game, then authority wins, because authority isabout the perception of the consumer. If they believe you an authority,you are. In the long run, of course, authenticity will trump it,because your authority fades without it. The converse is not true. Andyes, it’s a word game.” Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

What Is the Future of Social Media Marketing? [Marketing Cast]

first_img Social Media Inbound Marketing , David Meerman Scott shares his thoughts on the topic. Forget about the Notion of De-Marketization Weekly Marketing Cast Topics: In the future, David argues, the notion of demarketization will disappear, thus closing the gap between social media marketing and just marketing. “The sooner people realize that what we are talking about is marketing and communications; that what we are talking about is reaching people in the ways that they want to be reached, using these sorts of networks that they are already on, then the faster they can become successful at using those new tools,” David explains. The only way to prepare adequately for the future is by looking back at history. As David mentions, exploring the evolution of e-business, for example, can help today’s marketers better understand the evolution of social media marketing. “Nobody talks about e-business anymore because it is just business,” he says. We are now observing the same type of dynamic we witnessed ten years ago, and we should be able to recognize these familiar patterns. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Dec 27, 2010 1:01:00 PM, updated July 08 2013 Learn from Previous Innovations In order to leverage technologies for their business needs, marketers should stay up-to-date with latest trends. That’s why many wonder what the future holds for social media marketing. In today’s episode of the A couple of years ago, Twitter didn’t exist and Facebook was limited to students only. A few years from now, new tools will populate the online landscape. But don’t think of them as completley new—they simply reinforce some fundamentals of marketing. While they will provide new channels for doing marketing, they will also sustain the methodology of understanding your audience, creating something of value and providing it for free. The Tools Will Keep Changing (But Not the Methodology) In what ways do you think social media marketing will change? Should we even call it social media marketing anymore?last_img read more

4 Reasons Your Store Needs an eCommerce Website to Grow

first_img E-Commerce Websites Originally published Jan 12, 2011 1:30:00 PM, updated August 09 2019 For a business to grow it must consistently reach new customers and communicate effectively with existing ones. If you have a physical storefront you’ve probably realized these two requirements for growth are not easily achieved.  Creating an eCommerce website allows a retail store to break-through the limitations a physical location presents, while increasing sales of its products.Download Now: Ecommerce Marketing Plan Template4 Reasons an eCommerce Website is Necessary to Grow Your Store: 1. Collect lead and customer data for email marketing.We know it’s tough to collect email addresses and other useful information during checkout in your store. Shoppers at the finish line of making a purchase will normally decide not to extend the process by providing info for the clerk to plug-in regardless of the offer. Gathering information online is much more effective as website visitors can do this on their own time.Take into consideration the fact that you only have the opportunity to speak to someone making a purchase, leaving out all prospective customers who leave without a bag in their hand – collecting leads online is a more effective method.Email marketing gives you the ability to increase new and repeat business by strategically and continuously re-engaging prospective customers. This opportunity doesn’t exist for businesses strictly running a physical storefront. You’ll also need to develop ways to capture email addresses with various offers your website can provide.2. Reach new prospective customers through search engines.A large factor in a physical store’s success derives from location. If you’re not in a good one the visibility of the store is lessened. Having an eCommerce website levels the playing field between prime locations and less trafficked areas. Instead of your physical address determining your business’s location, your ability to rank in searches engines determines how visible you are. Potential customers who haven’t driven past your stores or heard about your from someone else, have the ability to find you online. Everyday someone is searching for something relevant to your stores products and eCommerce site gives you the ability to get found by and sell your products to them directly through the web.3. Increase visibility of store promotions.Every store has certain promotions and are always looking for ways to spread the word about their newest deals.  Your eCommerce store is another avenue to market your special promotions. These promotions are also a great way to execute on the first point of this post, collecting email addresses.  Visitors to either one of your stores (online and offline) should be exposed to these promotions so they can take advantage of them. Promotions help the business grow shor- term with increased sales and long-term since promotions typically include a sign-up step – giving you the ability to reach out to these people later for repeat business.4. Allow prospective customers to shop where, how, and when they want.If you only have one way people can shop for your products you’re missing out on the percentage of shoppers who prefer to (and sometimes are only willing to) shop the alternate way.Many people like to shop online to avoid traveling time and traffic while enjoying the comfort of their own home. Shopping online also gives them the ability to shop when they want; including times that your store is closed. Remember, your eCommerce store is ALWAYS open. Regardless of an individual’s reasons, more and more people are turning online to get shopping done.Others prefer to drive to the physical store so they can touch and examine the products. Even if they found your store online and researched your products in more detail, they may decide to make the commute to the store in order to make the purchase.The advantages of one store will counter the disadvantages of the other which allows store owners to cover all of their bases and eliminate the possibility of these disadvantages affecting their sales numbers.To learn more about the benefits of have both an online and offline location, also known as “click and mortar”, and how the two can work together please register for our “click and mortar” webinar .Photo credit: aota.org Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

How to Master Twitter for Business in 2011 [Free Ebook!]

first_imgWho knew that 140-character messages could do such wonders for your business? The fact is, when used effectively, Understand Twitter’s role in social search Track and analyze your campaigns How to Use Twitter for Business ” is a free introductory guide that covers everything from getting started with tweeting to generating leads on Twitter. It was specifically written for users who are getting started in 2011, and by reading it, you’ll be well on your way to becoming a Twitter rockstar! Twitter can have a number of business benefits Start unlocking Twitter’s business potential today by learning how to leverage Twitter’s 200 million users to improve your marketing and business results. Specifically, the 40-page guide will teach you how to: Topics: Originally published Jul 5, 2011 11:42:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Luckily, we’ve just released a new ebook to guide the way! ” Download your copy here! Twitter Marketing Businesses of all sizes in various industries are discovering the power of tweeting as a way to achieve their business goals, but if you’re just starting out, it may be tough to know where exactly to begin. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack , like helping you develop and promote your brand and content, interact and support your customer base, monitor social media, develop online relationships, and yes, even generate leads! Use Twitter for business, marketing, lead generation, PR, and customer service Optimize your Twitter profile for business Find the right people to follow and attract new followerslast_img read more

The 3 Biggest Challenges Facing Marketing Agencies

first_imgThis article was written by Mike Goulet and Tyler Orfao and industry report that will help marketing agencies with their own challenges This problem is often the result of poor sales practices. Many marketing agencies rely on their portfolios, hoping that their past work will impress their prospect enough to sell them. A lack-luster sales process ignores specific client needs and fails to probe deeper into a client’s overall goals. Potential clients will leave the sales pitch disinterested and frustrated from hearing only about the agency’s capabilities.  Similar to the previous challenge, these marketing agencies could be unable to close a deal due to the lack of adequate services required to accomplish the prospect’s marketing goals. Delves deeper into lead generation, retainers, and other components of the marketing services sales process. . Agencies need to develop a stronger sales process to determine their prospect’s goals and challenges, as well as devise plans together. Truly robust sales processes focus on client pain points and goal-oriented solutions. Agencies should also consider using a customer relationship management (CRM) system that tracks lead intelligence and activity. Finally, like the previous challenge, these agencies should also reconsider their service offerings, and keep in mind customers may want complete and integrated marketing solutions. This blog post provides a glimpse into the biggest challenges facing the marketing services industry today. It also serves to launch an initiative to gain greater insight into the marketing services industry through a Ironically, the challenge marketing agencies struggle with the most is marketing for themselves. This is understandable, however, since there are so many factors that go into generating leads. A lot of this could be contributed to choosing marketing channels that are interruptive and non-permission based in nature. Potential customers are increasingly less tolerant of outbound marketing practices and search for the products and services they seek to buy. Another contributing factor could be that these marketing agencies often prioritize working with their current clients over lead generation activities. 2. Cash Flow is Too Variable survey What Agencies Can Do Based on preliminary data HubSpot has been collecting from marketing agencies, some common trends have emerged that we feel are worth sharing.  The most pressing and valuable trend to address is what agencies say is their biggest challenge.  Two thirds of the marketing agencies polled listed the following 3 issues as their biggest marketing challenge:   Determines what makes a successful marketing services package. Marketing agencies who considered this to be their biggest challenge are typically too tactical and tend to specialize in only a few services for their clients. By only performing niche services like website design or social media marketing, these agencies mostly acquire projects rather than retainers, leaving clients to rely on them for only a brief time. Left with only project work, cash flow becomes unpredictable and often leads to financial challenges. 1. Not Generating Enough Leads Originally published Jul 21, 2011 6:30:00 PM, updated October 20 2016center_img : State of the Marketing Services Industry Report Identifies industry best practices. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack : Marketing agencies with this problem should reconsider which marketing channels they use to reach their prospects, and use more inbound marketing techniques like blogging, SEO and social media to generate traffic. In order to turn traffic into leads, agencies should also start using some “top of the funnel” lead generation offers because potential leads are more inclined to download marketing material if it provides helpful advice. Agencies must also streamline client delivery processes in order to free resources that can then be spent on business development and lead generation activities.  In turn, this will lower the reliance on referrals and repeat business, which is often hard to predict and grow. ” that: 3. Difficulty Signing Up New Clients What agencies can do What Agencies Can Do Interested in learning more about how to conquer these challenges? Well, we are too, and could use your help! We are conducting a survey for marketing agencies that will identify what makes a strong marketing agency impervious to these weaknesses. After collecting the surveys we will create a “ Topics: : Agencies should develop a process that encourages continuous, high-level collaboration with clients across a variety of specific online marketing activities.  These activities and services should also enable the monitoring of a lead from its earliest conversion to the final sale.  In doing so, agencies can determine how to repeat the marketing activities that produce sales and increase clients’ ROI.  This complete marketing strategy also ensures that agencies become a critical component of a client’s success, which results in more retainer opportunities and more dependable cash flow. Agency Marketing Survey Image Credit: Patrick M. Len via Flickerlast_img read more

How to Decide Between a Dedicated or Shared IP for Email Marketing

first_img Email Deliverability At last week’s eM+C event , All About eMail Live!, several questions arose at a roundtable discussion about the benefits of a shared IP versus a dedicated IP for your email marketing sending. If you’re weighing these two options, it can get a little confusing as one solution is not always better than the other for every business.Selecting the right solution for you depends on a variety of factors. And the first step to figuring out whether you should opt for a dedicated or shared IP is by understanding what exactly the difference between these two options is. Let’s get started with some definitions: Shared IP: A shared IP is one that is used by more than one sender, i.e. a pool of companies. Dedicated IP: A dedicated IP is one that is used by a single sender. The sender must purchase and set up the dedicated IP with their email marketing vendor.Now let’s dive into the factors that should go into selecting a dedicated or shared IP. Cost This aspect of the decision is fairly straightforward. Shared IPs are usually less expensive than dedicated IPs because your email marketing vendor can spread the cost of a shared IP across more customers. Companies opting for a dedicated IP also typically have to pay for the initial setup fees and/or recurring maintenance costs. But you’re probably not making a decision based on cost alone, so let’s move on to the next factor that will impact your decision. Maintenance With a dedicated IP, you need to need to make sure you’re sending out enough email to maintain a top notch reputation with ISPs. (We’ll talk more about reputation as a factor in your decision next.) If you opt for a dedicated IP and you either don’t send much email, or you don’t send email on a consistent basis, then it could be difficult to establish yourself as a trustworthy, spam-free sender. This negatively impacts your deliverability; ISPs and webmail services look for a decent amount of consistent volume before they allow you to reach their users’ inboxes.In the case of a shared IP, however, this is not a problem — your email service provider (ESP) can pool the emails of multiple senders, and thus maintain the IP’s reputation so you don’t have to worry about maintaining the proper sending volume. Reputation As you may already know, your sender reputation is everything when it comes to deliverability. If you are sending from an email server with a spic-and-span reputation, your emails will make it in front of the eyes of your subscribers. And as we noted previously, your email volume is one factor that goes into the decision to place your emails in a recipient’s inbox. The other contributing factors pertain to list cleanliness, which is determined by metrics like hard bounce rate , spamtrap hits, and SPAM complaint rate.Senders on a shared IP are lumped together from a reputation standpoint. The reputation of the IP you’re using is determined by the email practices of everyone who uses that IP. For that reason, ESPs are often proactive about list cleanliness by establishing import rules , and typically monitor their servers for senders employing poor or black-hat email marketing tactics that could hurt deliverability for everyone.Now you may be thinking, “If I go with my own dedicated IP, I’ll never have to worry about the consequences of other senders’ bad behavior.” That’s true — but this means you need to be completely honest with yourself about your own email practices. If you’re not completely confident in the cleanliness of your list, it’s possible that you can actually benefit from the good habits of your neighbors on a shared IP. I’m not advocating that you test your ESP’s threshold for bad practices, rather pointing out that you are more accountable for your actions when you use a dedicated IP. What to Do Once You Decide on Shared vs. Dedicated IP So let’s say you’ve made a decision. What are the next steps? If you’re going to go with a shared IP, make sure you ask your ESP these two questions: 1) What are your rules for importing subscribers? ( Here is a list of the questions HubSpot asks of our own customers. ) These rules are important for you to know — not only because your IP neighbors have to abide by them, but also because you have to, too! 2) What are the acceptance rates of your shared IPs? You can follow this up by asking for their Return Path Sender Score , the trusted standard for email deliverability. To give you a sense of what is normal, a recent study from Return Path reported that for servers with a Sender Score of 91+ (i.e. legitimate servers), only 88% of messages actually ended up in the inbox. If you go the alternate route and decide you’re ready for a dedicated IP, talk to your ESP about their offerings and be prepared to warm up any new IP addresses. Warming up an IP address is a critical step to earning a stellar reputation. The idea is that you want to gradually increase the volume of email sent, rather than blasting out a large volume too quickly. As a new IP address, ISPs won’t recognize you as a “good sender” right away, and therefore could mistake your new blasts as malicious, impacting your deliverability. Have you ever been through the process of deciding between a dedicated or shared IP? Share the process you used to evaluate the pros and cons in the comments! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Mar 27, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated July 28 2017 Topics:last_img read more