#Nextchat RECAP: How To Build Cultures of Curiosity

first_imgOn April 17 @shrmnextchat chatted with @DrDianeHamilton, #SHRM19 speaker, nationally syndicated radio host, leadership speaker and author of “Cracking the Curiosity Code,” and Creator of Curiosity Code Index to talk about How to Create Cultures of Curiosity. If you missed this excellent #Nextchat filled with great advice for organizations to encourage more curiosity and innovation, you can read all the tweets HERE or below:last_img

How Zimbra Went From Web 2.0 Poster Child to $350M Yahoo! Acquisition, in 2 Years!

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#Analysis#web Last week Read/WriteWeb editor Richard MacManus interviewed Satish Dharmaraj, Zimbra co-founder and CEO. The result is a 30 minute podcast available on Read/WriteTalk (transcript included). The following post is highlights from the discussion, which focused on Zimbra’s journey from October 2005 Web 2.0 Conference launch to September 2007 acquisition by Yahoo! for $350M.In September 2007 Web Office startup Zimbra was acquired by Yahoo! for $350M. As I noted at the time, it seems like only yesterday that Zimbra was the buzz of the 2005 Web Conference (which incidentally was the first Silicon Valley conference I attended). Yet in just under 2 years from launching, Zimbra went from Web Office poster child (one of them at any rate) to a company worth $350 million. How did it happen? What lessons can aspiring entrepreneurs learn from Zimbra, as they attempt to create a multi-million dollar business too? For me there was only one way to find out: interview Satish Dharmaraj, Zimbra co-founder and CEO.The entire interview is up on our podcast show, Read/WriteWeb. Here are some of my favorite bits:Question: who came up with the idea for Zimbra and when did that happen?Satish: “While we were brainstorming on ideas – and we cycled through a lot of them – we always kept coming back to: What are the big things that people do on a computer? Well, they search and they web browse and they read email. We started believing that people spend more time on email than search or web browsing, and so we said, ‘Man, that’s huge.’ It seems so evident but that was basically the genesis. Well Google is tackling search and, obviously, Firefox and IE are tackling the web browsing issue, and then we have Outlook or Thunderbird or Entourage for email. Well, that seems really broken. […]Then at the same time, we were thinking about technologies and how the web browser is becoming the predominant platform of modern day computing. Do we really need to have a desktop app and can we do everything on the server side? That’s something to break into.”Question: […] What was the initial reaction to the product when you launched in October of 2005?Satish: “Peoples reactions to it was unanimously: ‘I can’t believe this is a web browser. I can’t believe that this can be done all inside of Ajax and all with a server that’s not hosted or with data that resided remotely.’ Our goal was to basically blow the pants away of Outlook or any other client in terms of user interactivity, even though it was inside of a web browser. I think when we launched, we successfully got that kind of a reaction from people who were just totally wowed with it. They were all extremely excited that somebody was putting up such a huge and competitive product in the mail landscape which people had thought had been written off.Then, for us, we knew in our hearts, and we didn’t want to be a web 2.0 company that’s just all hype and glam. We knew that we had planned all of this carefully with our board. We had always wanted to start making money. It has happened. As soon as we launched in October, back before we started making money, before we sold to Yahoo, we were handsomely cash flow positive. So we’re always proud of what we went through as a company: got a lot of bugs, got a great product but at the end of the day, we were making money. That was basically the difference that set us apart.”Question: One thing that web 2.0 critics often derive about the current generation of web apps is that they are features and not businesses. Also, the web 2.0 startups have too large a reliance on M&A as the end goal. This is something we constantly hear from critics of web 2.0. Zimbra was obviously a very successful buyout. Was that your plan from the start or did you start out with the aim of being a viable standalone business? Back in October of 2005, what was your end goal for Zimbra at that point?Satish: “Honestly, I can say this. We set out to build a great company with a real business behind it. That’s what I think people should do when they start a business. They [have] got to think about: How do I make this an independently successful cash flow self-sustaining business? Then, there’ll be very interesting M&A opportunities that will come and knock on the door. If instead we started a company thinking that there is going to be a quick flip, [in] 90% of the cases that does not work out because no one is interested in buying – or they want to buy you off really cheap. We were not thinking of an ideal nor were we thinking of an M&A. We were just thinking: Let’s go and create a compelling product and create some real business in specific markets. That’s what we started out to do and that’s what we did.”Listen to the full podcast for more insight into the growth of Zimbra and some of the tactics they employed to build their ultimately successful web 2.0 business. richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketcenter_img Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

Completing Loss Prevention Courses for Certification Drives Results

first_imgWeston Pate, LPCThe decision to pursue LPQ or LPC certification through the Loss Prevention Foundation means that soon you will be able to achieve better results in your organization and in your professional life. But between that decision and the credential after your name lies just a little work in the form of comprehensive loss prevention courses.Weston Pate, LPC, zone manager, asset and profit protection for Kmart, knows how much hard work must go into the LPC curriculum. In the recent Certification column in the September-October issue of LP Magazine, Pate shares his experience as a working LP professional who elected to pursue certification. In the column, Pate talks about the benefits he has seen on an organizational and personal level since taking the course:“I think that one of the biggest benefits I have seen is the ability to speak to certain parts of the business better, such as supply chain, and I also have seen interest from my peers and my direct reports now that they see the LPC credential on my signature. I believe this has been a great benefit because if others take the course, then they too will be better equipped to drive better results.”Pate also points out how comprehensive the loss prevention courses in the certification process are:- Sponsor – “It’s very comparable to my college coursework and takes the same level of discipline and self-motivation to complete. This is something that you have to motivate yourself to do, and the feeling you get once you have completed the coursework and final exam is amazing.”Check out “Drive Better Results in Your Company and Career” to read the full column and learn how the certification process can change the way an LP professional approaches his job. You can also visit the Table of Contents for the September-October 2016 issue or register for a free subscription to the magazine. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

Intel-based Tablets & QuickBooks Pair Well for Small Businesses

first_imgFor organizations needing accounting software to stay current on their affairs, QuickBooks has long been a popular program and the most widely used software among small businesses. Remote access capabilities, improved metrics for SMBs, remote payroll assistance, electronic payments, online banking, mapping features and marketing options through Google, and improved e-mail functionality through Microsoft Outlook and Outlook Express can give entrepreneurs a variety of tools to help them succeed under a single platform.Similarly, tablets are quickly becoming the go-to device for smaller teams that may need to complete tasks in and around a store, warehouse, or multi-use office in addition to offsite work. Together, the hardware and software can be a powerful pairing. But, it’s crucial to understand the reach and limitations of QuickBooks on mobile. To gain a better perspective of performance, Intel commissioned Prowess Consulting to put multiple devices running QuickBooks to the test.Prowess Consulting evaluated QuickBooks options for mobile users and examined the software’s capabilities and user experience on a range of mobile devices. The QuickBooks user experience varies notably between different mobile device platforms. Of the devices Prowess tested—the Dell™ Venue™ 11 Pro, the Samsung® Galaxy Note® 10.1, and the Apple® iPad Air™—they concluded that the mobile device best suited for productive QuickBooks use was the Dell Venue 11 Pro powered by an Intel processor and running Windows* 8.1.The tests conducted on the three tablets included basic mobile tasks like comprehensive reporting, standard banking, along with importing data and exporting data. Using the Dell Venue 11 Pro, users were able to create a greater amount of reports and get deeper customer insight. Customer service saw improvement, too, with twice as many ways to access richer features, functions, and customer data. Plus, QuickBooks data was better leveraged by exporting it as an Excel spreadsheet available for use anywhere with Windows* 8.If you’re a small business owner looking to stay productive by using QuickBooks on a mobile device, be sure to review your options before purchasing. And be sure to keep an eye on the variety of services available in the market as cloud services may soon disrupt traditional accounting software.For more on the Prowess QuickBooks study, head to “Do More with Intuit® QuickBooks®” to read the full text and view the infograhic for a more detailed overview.last_img read more