Police: Lyndhurst man charged with trying to steal an ambulance from…

first_img Police: Lyndhurst man charged with trying to steal an ambulance from Hoboken hospital CrimeHoboken Bayonne Previous articleNorth Bergen officials pay tribute to local heroes at annual Veterans Day ceremonyNext articleLETTER: Despite coming up short, Franco thanks Bayonne’s 1st Ward supporters John Heinis RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGShoboken policehoboken university medical centerresisting arresttheft SHARE Bayonne man pepper sprayed, arrested after punching cop in the face, authorities say By John Heinis – November 12, 2019 9:58 am 0 Bayonne man busted with cocaine, heroin, semi-automatic handgun after fleeing from cops Bayonne Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter CarePoint Health reaches deal for Cigna Health Insurance to join their network Bayonne A Lyndhurst man was charged with trying to steal an ambulance from outside the Hoboken University Medical Center on Sunday morning, resisting arrest in several instances as police tried to detain and process him, authorities said. Hoboken University Medical Center. Photo via carepointhealth.org.By John Heinis/Hudson County ViewNicholas Soto, 30, of Lyndhurst, was charged with burglary, theft, escape, and resisting arrest, according to Police Det. Lt. Edgardo Cruz.On Sunday at approximately 7:34 a.m., officers were dispatched to the Hoboken University Medical Center to assist security. The security officer reports that a man who was not being treated or waiting for anyone would not leave the waiting room, police said.After he was escorted outside, the officers remained in the area for several minutes to make sure he did not return. After a few minutes, they observed the same man pacing back and forth near the ambulance which was parked outside the hospital, officials said.He was then observed opening the ambulance door and then entering the vehicle. As the officers cautiously approached, Soto locked both doors to the ambulance. He then attempted several times to place the ambulance in gear but was unsuccessful.The officers, with the assistance from security, were able to gain entry by way of the rear double doors. As they attempted to place Soto under arrest, he continuously resisted by pulling his arms away from the officers preventing them from handcuffing him.After several minutes, they were able to gain control and safely place him under arrest. He was transported to headquarters for processing. At headquarters while he was being fingerprinted, he pulled away from the officer and attempted to flee by running towards the door of the processing room, police said.With the assistance of several officers, they were able to regain control of Soto and continue processing. He was later remanded to the Hudson County Rehabilitation Center, authorities said. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Nursing Simulation/Clinical Instructor

first_imgThe Nursing Simulation/Clinical Instructor is responsible for theday-to-day activities of the Learning Resource Center (LRC) withinthe School of Nursing and provide direct education to undergraduate& graduate students. Participation in facultymeetings/committees is expected to support faculty and students andexpand simulation and clinical experiences., The NursingSimulation/Clinical Instructor will: Assist in the development ofskills review days. Lead facilitated lab experiences for studentswho need remedial work. Develop case scenarios in collaborationwith faculty for both structured labs and simulation. Leadsimulation scenarios for courses within the School of Nursing.Supervise at least one clinical group in the acute/communitysetting. Oversee the daily operations of the Learning ResourcesCenter (LRC)., The Nursing Simulation/Clinical Instructor will:Assist in the development of skills review days. Lead facilitatedlab experiences for students who need remedial work. Develop casescenarios in collaboration with faculty for both structured labsand simulation. Lead simulation scenarios for courses within theSchool of Nursing. Supervise at least one clinical group in theacute/community setting. Oversee the daily operations of theLearning Resources Center (LRC).PI131927216last_img read more

Video Specialist

first_imgOther duties asassigned[5%]Minimum qualifications(mandatory):High School Diploma/GEDrequired. Four years related experience required. Additionaleducation may substitute for required experience to the extentpermitted by the JHU equivalency formula.Experience withmultimedia production, lighting, audio engineering & videoediting.Experience utilizingvideo production equipment (cameras, lights, audio equipment) andpost production software(e.g., Adobe Premiere, After Effects, AdobeAudition, Adobe Photoshop).Portfolio withrelevant work experience and examplesrequired PreferredQualifications:Bachelor’s degree from aregionally accredited college or university preferred.Concentrations in Multimedia, video production, related field, orequivalent experience is preferred.2 years’ experience invideo production work.Ability to keep track ofevent calendars.Strong interpersonal andorganizational skills.Proficient in allaspects of video production, such as leading shoots; audiorecording, mixing and editing; familiarity with video compressionbest practices and media assetmanagement.Experience takingconcepts/ideas and creating multimediacontent.Solid experience withdigital technology and editing software packages (e.g. AdobePremiere Pro, Adobe Audition, Media Encoder, Photoshop,etc.)Demonstrable videoediting ability with a strong portfolioThorough knowledge oftiming, motivation and continuityFamiliarity with motiongraphics elementsWorking knowledge offilming equipment (HD Camera, microphone, studio lighting, andteleprompter).Experience withanimation in either After Effects or interest in learning relatedprosumer software (Vyond, Moovly,Powtoon)Experience or interestin learning how to work with 360 camerafootageInterest in learningbasic interactive video skills andsoftwares Quality Assurance of 3rd PartyDevelopers [5%]Reviews 3rd partycontent for quality and consistency asneeded. Film & Video Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore You need to sign in or create an account to save Johns Hopkins University Maryland, United States JH at Legg MasonHarbor East – Carey Business School Maryland, United States Maryland, United States Salary Not Specified The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Salary Not Specified Twitter Share Save Enrollment Marketing Specialist Communications Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Enrollment Marketing Specialist Save Reputation Marketing Manager More searches like this Assessment & Evaluation Analyst Reputation Marketing Manager Johns Hopkins University Special knowledge, skills, andabilities:Knowledge of lecture andscreen capture tools such as Camtasia, , Panopto, Kalturaetc.Working knowledge of MSOffice Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint)Ability to communicateeffectively orally and in writing.Ability to preparewritten communication with an attention to detail andaccuracy.Excellent customerservice skills.Ability to managemultiple projects, prioritize, and meetdeadlines.Ability to work aflexible schedule including evenings andweekends. LinkedIn Create rough and finalcuts of video contentEnsure logicalsequencing and smooth runningConsult and collaboratewith stakeholders from production to post-productionprocessContinuously discoverand implement new editing technologies and industry’s bestpractices to maximize efficiency.Be part of the QAprocess for other multimedia teamprojectsSupport interactive media production for multiplecourses in development, revamp, or revisioning.Ensure all projects meetorganizational standards for production value, brand, and archiveorganization You need to sign in or create an account to save Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) Any specific physicalrequirements for the job:Ability to lift 30poundsClassified Title:MultimediaTechnicianWorking Title: Video SpecialistRole/Level/Range: ATO 37.5/02/OF Starting Salary Range:$39,229-53,976 annuallyEmployee group: Full Time Schedule: Monday – Friday 8:30-5pm plus evenings and weekendsas needed to accommodate production schedule Exempt Status: Non-ExemptLocation: 46-MD:JH at Harbor East Department name: 60000068-Teaching and Learning @ CareyPersonnel area: Carey Business SchoolThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Media Studies Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Generalsummary/purpose:The Video Specialist, interacting withstudents, faculty, and staff, assists with all aspects of videoproduction; from contributing project concept ideas through theediting and delivery of video projects. You must be able to workacross multiple recording environments; studio and on locationwhile maintaining high levels of production value. Inpost-production the Video Specialist should have strong skills inworking with large batches of video content, managing continuity ofproduction value across all videos while bring your own artisticvision to the final product.As this role is part of a Teaching andLearning team, we are also looking for someone who is interested ingrowing their video skillset by learning how to develop interactivevideos. Reporting to the Video Specialist Supervisor, the idealcandidate will have an interest in instructional media and onlineeducation. You will excel if you are self-driven to dive into mediaproduction, comfortable balancing different priorities, and open tonew challenges. We are looking for a creative, dynamic thinker withstrong, writing and editing skills. An aptitude for visualstorytelling.Candidates for this position should be prepared to provide aportfolio of work as a part of the interviewprocess.Note: This position is not eligible for visasponsorship.Note: This position may workremotely. May be required to be onsite at Harbor East campus up to40% of the time. This position requires occasional trips toWashington, DC for recordingpurposes.Specific duties &responsibilities:Video Production[80%]Supports videoproduction. by setting up cameras, microphones, and lights. Assistin the video studio (setup camera, screen capture, and monitorrecordings).Helps with studioequipment installation and maintenanceAccurately edits audioand/or video from script, development of both text-based andanimated content.Ensures visual elementsand quality standards are maintained across the entire videoproduction process.Retouching videos,including color correction, graphics/animations, and timingmusic/sound to copy.Shoot video and recordaudio in-studio and in the field.Input music, dialogues,graphics and effects Similar jobs Salary Not Specified Save Assessment & Evaluation Analyst Digital Media Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Facebook Faculty Positions Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Learning Technology Promotion andTraining[5%]Develops asynchronoustraining materials around using video and multimediaobjects.Create, develop, editand implement new content for multimedia projects and ensure thecontinued growth, efficacy, accuracy, and timeliness of T&L’sweb-based communications.Assists faculty indeveloping reusable learning objects (Videos, lecture captureetc.). Research [5%]Keeps abreast ofdevelopments of related instructionaltechnologies.last_img read more

THW Kiel signs Wael Jallouz on three-year deal

first_imgShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsThe promising young Tunisian player Wael Jallouz, will be joining THW Kiel next season. The 21-year old currently plays in Hammamet, and will be travelling to Kiel in Summer 2013. He has signed a three-year deal with the “Zebras”. This was confirmed by THW Kiel’s official website and their general manager Klaus Elwardt travelled to Tunisia to sign the official contract with the perspective Tunisian player. Recommended for you ShareTweetShareShareEmail 2 Comments Related Items:elwardt, jallouz, THW Kiel, wael jallouz Pingback: THW Kiel sign Brazilian wunderkind Ferreira! | Handball Planet 2 Commentscenter_img Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. THW Kiel with +5 from Szeged Harald Reinkind to stay at THW Kiel Pingback: Rasmus Lauge is close to THW Kiel | Handball Planet SG Flensburg beat THW Kiel in German derbylast_img read more

Cat Who Worked as a Late Night Hustler Now Raises Money For Charity

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhile some hustlers might use their winnings for gambling and debauchery, this talented feline is using his earned cash to help those less fortunate.CASHnip Kitty is the resident kitty of GuRuStu, an advertising company in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The feline was originally adopted by the office staff to hunt mice two years, but because CASHnip was such a lovable mascot, they decided to keep him. In recent months, however, the employees discovered that CASHnip had a secret talent: he was secretly hustling humans out of their money.CHECK OUT: Man Comes Home to Find Cat Waiting For Him – Except He’s Never Owned a CatAt the start of a work week, they found a pile of one dollar bills laying around the cat on the ground by the front door.After some investigation, they found that passerby had been trying to play with CASHnip through the glass. As a means of enticing the feline into action, someone had slipped money through the crack in the front door only to have CASHnip snatch it away. So many people were fascinated by the cat’s unique skills, it had become an ongoing game to lure him into action with some cash.The office employees then decided to put their mascot’s skills to good use and donate all of the money to the Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless.WATCH: Kitten Has Team of Piglets to Watch Over Him During His Seizures The team erected a sign reading: “CASHnip Kitty is a hustler with a philanthropic heart. He will snatch your money and donate it to the Tulsa Day Center for the Homeless. CASHnip Kitty says, ‘Slide a dollar through the slot and great blessings will follow.’”Since putting up the sign, CASHnip has raised over $100 for the local homeless shelter.You can also follow his shenanigans via CASHnip’s own Facebook page.(WATCH CASHnip in action in the video below)Click To Share The Pawesome News With Your Friends (Photo by CASHnip Kitty)Kitten Has Team of Piglets to Watch Over Him During His Seizures (WATCH)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

SCOUTS

first_imgBOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA-HIGHLANDER DISTRICThttp://highlanderdistrict.org/Authorized Patrons: Everyone with appropriately aged children is an authorized patron)Services Provided: Offer programs for youth from 7 years through 21 years of age. The primary goal of the program is to build character, citizenship and physical fitness.Several programs are provided: Tiger Cubs at age 7; Cub Scouts, age 8-11; Boy Scouts, age 11-18; Venture and Exploring Programs, age 14-21. The Exploring and Venturing Programs are co-ed and are open to both male and female.GIRL SCOUTS OF AMERICANC COASTAL PINES GIRL SCOUT COUNCIL, INC.http://www.nccoastalpines.orgLocation: 894 Elm St., Suite B&C, Fayetteville, NC 28303Phone 437-9900Hours of Operation:Monday-Wednesday 0900-1700Thursday 0900-1830Friday 0900-1200Authorized Patrons: Open to all girls ages 5-17, in grades K-12, and adult volunteers.Services Provided: In Girl Scouting, girls discover the fun, friendship and power of girls together; build character and skills for success in the real world; develop qualities that will serve girls all their lives-strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth…Girl Scouts – Where Girls Grow Stronglast_img read more

Burlington Electric issues Defeat the Peak alert for Tuesday

first_imgBurlington Electric Department,Encourages Community to Reduce Energy Usage from 5-9 pmVermont Business Magazine Burlington Electric Department (BED) issued a peak alert for Tuesday, June 23 as part of its Defeat the Peak program launched during summer 2017 (view news release(link is external)), encouraging members of the Burlington community to reduce their energy usage from 5:00-9:00pm on that day.Burlingtonians can lend a hand by taking the following steps on what is projected to be an unusually hot summer day:Raise thermostat temperatures or turn off air conditioners between the hours of 5:00 and 9:00pm before returning air conditioners to cooler settings (COVID-19 note: please be aware of minimum ventilation requirements and airflow patterns related to COVID-19 – more information is available on the Vermont Occupational Safety and Health Administration (VOSHA) website at https://labor.vermont.gov/vermont-occupational-safety-and-health-administration-vosha(link is external));Wait until after 9:00pm or later to use washing machines, clothing dryers, dishwashers, and other appliances;Turn off non-essential lights until 9:00pm and later; andDelay other discretionary electric consumption until after 9:00pm.The New England region reaches peak demand for electricity during the summer. A significant portion of BED’s costs as a utility is determined by how much energy our community is using during the summer peak.“We are excited to continue Defeat the Peak  for our fourth year, while recognizing that with COVID-19 many of our customers are using energy differently this summer than in previous years,” stated Darren Springer, BED General Manager. “We encourage our customers to participate knowing that even small, individual steps add to our community effort to reduce costs and protect our environment. During the peak, please consider unplugging phone and laptop charging cords, adjusting thermostats, and waiting until after the peak to run dishwashers and other appliances. With your help, we can continue to hit our peak reduction targets and support non-profits that are making a difference in Burlington through the Defeat the Peak program.”Two more traditional incentives for Burlingtonians who take peak day actions include: potential reductions in utility costs that help keep electric rates low and stable; and environmental benefits that come with reduced energy demand on the regional electric grid, which decreases the need for use of polluting oil and natural gas generators around New England. A more unique and innovative incentive introduced by BED based on customer input is a community reward opportunity through which a local nonprofit – in this case Ronald McDonald House Charities(link is external) – will benefit from a $1,000 contribution from BED if our customers hit the targeted amount of load reduction on a peak day.Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Burlington, Vermont, is a “home away from home” for families with seriously ill children seeking treatment at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital. “Ronald McDonald House Charities is delighted to support Burlington Electric in its efforts to help our community cut costs and save energy,” stated Kristine Bickford, Executive Director of RMHC. “BED is leading the way forward on all levels, and this partnership aligns with our objective to see positive outcomes in our community. Just as BED strives to provide exceptional care to its customers, RMHC’s main goal is to provide unconditional support to its guests while they are focused on the health of their children. It doesn’t get much better than that!”BED also notifies customers by email blast about peak day alerts. Customers are invited to sign up for these email notifications, view a video explaining Defeat the Peak, and learn more about the program by visiting www.burlingtonelectric.com/peak(link is external).  BED also shares information about peak day alerts with the community through social media channels, including Facebook(link is external) and Twitter(link is external).  Source: Burlington, VT – Burlington Electric Department 6.22.2020last_img read more

Positive social support from a spouse could have negative consequences, new research shows

first_imgShare Share on Facebook Email Pinterest LinkedIncenter_img Offering your spouse what you believe to be positive support could have negative physiological effects on them, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.A team of researchers from Binghamton University recruited sixty-five married couples and had them engage in two interactions in which each spouse selected a discussion topic about a stressor external to their marriage (e.g. poor physical fitness, the desire to get a new job). Before and after the interactions, spouses separately completed questions about their expectations and appraisals of their partner’s responsiveness during the discussion. The researchers took saliva samples from each spouse and measured for cortisol–a hormone that helps regulate stress in the body–at the beginning of the study and after each discussion. The most consistent finding was that observable behaviors when support was given and received during discussions of wives’ stressors were associated with wives’ perceptions of their husbands’ responsiveness and wives’ changes in cortisol.“What we found, interestingly enough, was that cortisol was really only affected in wives but not in husbands, and only in wives’ discussions,” said Hayley Fivecoat, a former Binghamton University student who published the results in her dissertation. “For one, we did find that when husbands showed more positive behaviors while they were giving support, wives’ cortisol actually went down. Interestingly, we found that when wives showed more negative behavior while their partner was giving them support, their cortisol also went down. That was unexpected. We found that when wives showed more positive behavior while they were receiving support, their cortisol actually went up–they showed signs of more physiological arousal.” Share on Twitter While communication skills are often the focus of many clinical interventions, the study suggests that skill in delivering and receiving social support (by using more “positive” support behaviors) is not consistently linked to actual reductions in cortisol, nor increases in perceived partner responsiveness, said Fivecoat. In fact, more positive behaviors may have unintended negative consequences, and classically defined negative behaviors can sometimes have positive effects.“Say a husband is giving advice to his wife when she has a problem. Even though giving advice is a constructive thing to do, it may not be helpful to her at the moment; maybe she just wants someone to listen to her,” said Nicole Cameron, assistant professor of psychology at Binghamton University and co-researcher. “Or maybe there could be the opposite, where the husband is being more of a supportive listener but the wife really wants someone to give her some advice. All of those things are positive, but one is going to have a better effect than the other. What this tells me is that social support is more idiosyncratic and specific to the person and the problem.”In helping couples support each other, clinicians may work together with couples to identify the ways they prefer to be supported in order to capitalize on the positive effects of perceived partner responsiveness on relationships, said Fivecoat. This may be a more fruitful approach than advocating for more general positive and negative communication behaviors while giving and receiving support.“Perhaps clinicians can highlight the positive intentions of support givers to elicit greater perceptions of understanding, validation and caring from supportive partners. By highlighting intentions of support givers, the effects of more positive behaviors could be enhanced, and the costs of more negative behaviors could be mitigated,” said Fivecoat. “Ultimately, a clearer understanding of social support processes, including what is effective in reducing physiological arousal, will allow couples to capitalize on the association between social support and marriage, and reduce the impact of stress on health.”The researchers plan on looking further into the data and publishing more findings in the future.“I think that there is a lot of research that still needs to be done, because not everybody gets out of counseling feeling better,” said Cameron. “So studying what makes people feel better or feel differently is important, and using hormones as a marker of the change is interesting because it goes further than words–you really can see how the body reacts to discussions. If we can figure out how to use these markers, we probably can really improve our knowledge about counseling and couple communication.”Other Binghamton researchers to contribute to this research include Matthew Johnson, chair and professor of psychology; and Richard Mattson, associate professor of psychology.Cameron’s dissertation was titled “Spousal social support is associated with perceptions of partner responsiveness and fluctuations in cortisol for married women.”last_img read more

NEWS SCAN: Early flu in Australia, H1N1 mortality in adults, seasonal flu vaccine and H1N1, WHO on drug resistance, spinach recall

first_imgApr 6, 2011Australian states hit hard with early flu seasonThe southern Australian states of Victoria and South Australia are seeing an early influenza season that is producing four to five times the number of flu cases reported at this time last year, according to local newspapers. Victoria’s health department has confirmed 353 flu cases this year, compared with 67 at the same time last year, according to the Melbourne-based Herald Sun. The story quotes flu specialist Dr Alan Hampson as attributing the phenomenon to increased rainfall, which may be keeping people indoors, as well as a mild flu season last year. In South Australia, lab-confirmed flu cases have reached 172, compared with 40 at this time last year, according to AdelaideNow. University of Adelaide virologist Chris Burrell also attributed the surge to increased precipitation. “What this means is that the upsurge that happens annually is coming earlier this year,” he said. Health officials are stressing the importance of early vaccination.Apr 6 Herald Sun storyApr 6 AdelaideNow articleCalifornia study says 50-somethings had highest 2009 H1N1 death rateA study of deaths in California from the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus showed that among adults, people in their 50s had the highest H1N1 mortality rate. Writing in PLoS One, researches from the California Department of Public Health report that 541 adults (20 years and older) died of H1N1 flu from April 2009 through August 2010. The annualized fatality rate per 100,000 population was highest in 50- to 59-year-olds at 2.6, followed by 60- to 69-year-olds at 1.7. The rates for younger and older age-groups ranged from 0.3 to 1.4. The authors say their findings are consistent with national data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which show a 2009 H1N1 mortality rate of 1.69 per 100,000 in the first 10 months of the pandemic in those 50 to 64, the highest of any age-group. The researchers noted that adults over 60 may have had some protection because of preexisting immunity. Among adults who were admitted to intensive care units for H1N1 illness, fatality rates ranged from 24% to 42%, the report says.Apr 5 PLoS One reportCDC report on H1N1 hospitalization and fatality ratesStudy: Seasonal flu vaccination did not affect H1N1 riskIn a case-control study in Victoria, Australia, seasonal influenza vaccination neither raised nor lowered the risk of infection with the 2009 H1N1 flu virus, according to a report published in Vaccine. The authors note that previous studies have yielded conflicting evidence on this question. The study involved sentinel patients who had flu-like illnesses at general practices in Victoria and were tested for the virus. The researchers found no evidence that the seasonal vaccine yielded significant protection for patients in any age-group, but age-specific point estimates suggested that the vaccine provided some non-significant level of protection in younger patients while increasing the risk of H1N1 in patients aged 50 to 64 years, the report says. Overall vaccine effectiveness for all ages was 3% (95% confidence interval, -48% to 37%).Apr 5 Vaccine reportWHO observance sets sights on drug resistanceIn its observance of World Health Day tomorrow, the World Health Organization (WHO) today unveiled a six-part policy package outlining measures that governments and their partners can use to combat antimicrobial resistance. With the launch of the document, the WHO warned that drug resistance problems are becoming more severe, requiring urgent action by many sectors to slow the spread and limit the impact on future generations. WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan said in a statement today, “At a time of multiple calamities in the world, we cannot allow the loss of essential medicines—essential cures for many millions of people—to become the next global crisis.” The WHO’s recommendations include developing and implementing comprehensive national plans, boosting surveillance and lab capacity, ensuring reliable access to essential medications, regulating and promoting the rational use of medications, improving infection prevention and control, and encouraging research and development of new therapies.Apr 6 WHO statementWHO “Combat Drug Resistance” Web portalSalmonella finding prompts spinach recallFresh Express, a produce company based in Salinas, Calif., said yesterday that it was recalling 2,939 cases of spinach after a random sample tested positive for Salmonella. The company said it wasn’t aware of any illnesses and that it was coordinating closely with regulatory officials. The subject of the recall is 9-ounce bags of fresh spinach that have product codes starting with H081 and H082, a UPC code of 7127913204, and use-by dates of Apr 6 and 7.Fresh Express said it was recalling the spinach out of an abundance of caution. The spinach was distributed in eight states: Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Ohio, and Maine. In addition, it may have been redistributed in the District of Columbia, New Jersey, Virginia, Delaware, Vermont, New Hampshire, and West Virginia.Apr 5 Fresh Express press releaselast_img read more

£360m makeover for Regent Street properties

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img