No 10 plans to run down clock in Brexit face-off

first_imgMain image: Getty No 10 plans to run down clock in Brexit face-off But City AM understands that Number 10 will not present its proposals in a formal, written, manner until the eleventh hour, after having successive efforts “trashed” almost immediately.  whatsapp The European Union has repeatedly called for operable, legal text before it will consider reopening the Withdrawal Agreement and removing the Irish backstop. Without the backstop’s removal, Prime Minister Boris Johnson says there will be no deal.  Johnson had a tumultuous visit to Luxembourg yesterday, with the first half of the trip yielding a positive result.  Talks at a lower level will be conducted on a daily basis, intensifying from current levels.  Following the “constructive” meeting, Downing Street spokesperson said: “The leaders agreed that the discussions needed to intensify and that meetings would soon take place on a daily basis.” LUXEMBOURG, LUXEMBOURG – SEPTEMBER 16: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives for a meeting with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker at a restaurant on September 16, 2019 in Luxembourg. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is holding his first meeting with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker in search of a Brexit deal. (Photo by Francisco Seco – Pool/Getty Images) But Bettel grew increasingly heated as he attacked the “lies” of the Vote Leave referendum campaign and the inadequacies of the Remain campaign, while the crowd cheered loudly throughout. It is understood that Downing Street asked for the press conference to be conducted indoors, after it became clear the loud crowd could become disruptive, however this was rejected by Luxembourg’s team. “These are homemade problems and we now have all to deal with them,” he said. “I won’t accept [responsibility] for the mess we are in for the moment.” But the source suggested the conversations Johnson and his team were having with their EU counterparts was “broadly” what would appear in any written form. During the lunch Juncker had reminded Johnson it was the UK’s “responsibility” to come up with legally operable alternatives to the backstop. Catherine Neilan center_img It is now thought the earliest a proposal will be put forward is after the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) in New York, where Johnson will meet world leaders, which will run from 24-30 September.  Johnson later met with Luxembourg Prime Minister Xavier Bettel, but this descended into a row after Bettel’s team refused to relocate the planned press conference, despite the presence of a small but vocal crowd. After a working lunch with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, the pair agreed that “political level” talks between the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier and Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay would resume, following two months’ absence.  Share Tuesday 17 September 2019 8:48 am Speaking next to an empty podium Bettel initially appeared willing to thank Johnson, with whom he had enjoyed a “longer than planned” meeting. He insisted: “We have just the right amount of time to do a deal… A lot of work is going on here. Speaking subsequently, in a quieter location, a rattled-looking Johnson explained that he would have been “drowned out by the noise” of the protesters. “Such proposals have not yet been made,” it added. whatsapp “This is a difficult moment. We are very keen to do it, but I don’t want people to think it’s in the bag. It’s not necessarily in the bag.” The UK will hold back from giving Brussels a written proposal for alternatives until as late as October, as the two sides try to out-manoeuvre each other in the final stages of Brexit talks. Any earlier would “not be the smart way to go about getting a deal”, said a senior government source.  Tags: Brexitlast_img read more

The government’s ballet dancer ad missed the mark – but let’s not write off retraining

first_img whatsapp whatsapp Opinion Higher education has a vital role to play, and institutions need to think about how they can develop students’ skill-sets — and interest — in taking on digital roles. That means starting a wider conversation about how varied and creative digital roles can be, and the wide range of people who might be suited to them. It is also important that the opportunities for retraining are made widely accessible. Here the government has made some progress, with the recent announcement of the National Skills Fund offering support that will be available to adult learners. More universities should also offer foundation years so people can gain the qualifications they might not have obtained at school and open up new doors to further learning. Open, inclusive and lifelong education is key to ensuring that everyone can be equipped with the skills they need to adapt to a rapidly changing market. It is time for us all to rethink retraining — not as an option you are resigned to because your first choice or dream career is no longer viable, but as a window of opportunity to a new world of exciting and fulfilling careers. It is time for us all to rethink retraining — not as an option you are resigned, but as a window of opportunity (Getty Images) Also Read: The government’s ballet dancer ad missed the mark – but let’s not write off retraining Show Comments ▼ On Monday, the government faced a great deal of backlash for promoting adverts encouraging retraining — suggesting, among other things, that an aspiring ballet dancer should retrain “in cyber”.  It is understandable that many people, particularly in the creative industries, are frustrated by the messages these adverts put out (even if they were not new but rather part of an ongoing Cyber First campaign run by the National Cyber Security Centre). With whole industries at risk of going under thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, millions face redundancy and an increasingly uncertain future in which the careers they worked hard to build may no longer be viable. They want to know that the government will support them, not write them off. But something has got lost in these adverts. The country is facing a serious recession that will alter the jobs market for a long time to come, potentially forever. For many of those who have lost jobs, retraining will be a crucial step towards accessing good, fulfilling careers that will weather the economic crisis and provide hope for the future. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyPast Factory”Waltons” Actress Says Magazine Ended Her CareerPast Factorybonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyZen HeraldEllen Got A Little Too Personal With Blake Shelton, So He Said ThisZen HeraldDefinitionAge Has Finally Caught Up To These CelebsDefinitionNews SharperChrissy Metz Is So Skinny Now And Looks Like A Model (Photos)News SharperJustPerfact USAMan Decides to File for Divorce After Taking a Closer Look at This Photo!   JustPerfact USAFinanceChatterViewers Had To Look Away When This Happened On Live TVFinanceChatter The government’s ballet dancer ad missed the mark – but let’s not write off retraining It is time for us all to rethink retraining — not as an option you are resigned, but as a window of opportunity (Getty Images) center_img Ultimately, we are facing a difficult period ahead and no one can predict the future. However, one thing that is for certain is that building up a solid foundation of digital skills and awareness of digital careers will be useful no matter what you end up doing. The idea of retraining can seem daunting, but it need not be a complete rewrite of a person’s existing skills and knowledge. Closing the skills gap means attracting bright people seeking a second career into areas such as cyber security or computing, as well as raising awareness of digital roles and opportunities within different sectors — including the arts. Martin JonesProfessor Martin Jones is deputy vice-chancellor at Staffordshire University City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. Main image credit: Getty Such careers may require new skills. Even before Covid-19, the widening digital skills gap was a hot topic for the government and businesses alike. The 2019 Open University Business Barometer report found that organisations in the UK are spending £4.4bn a year as a result of the skills shortage, with more than 68 per cent of employers struggling to find workers with the right skills.  Wednesday 14 October 2020 4:46 am Share It is time for us all to rethink retraining — not as an option you are resigned, but as a window of opportunity (Getty Images) Also Read: The government’s ballet dancer ad missed the mark – but let’s not write off retraining Condemned for being tone-deaf and undermining the arts sector, the criticism mirrors a similar reaction to comments made by the chancellor last week, when he claimed that people in “all walks of life” need to adapt for employment. The pandemic has only served to catalyse digital transformation, and digital skills are more in demand than ever before. For those uncertain about their futures in the “new normal” of the post-Covid world, this field represents an exciting opportunity.last_img read more

Watch: How some cells serve as unlikely heroes to defend the brain from viral invaders

first_img @_gaffknee Scientists have discovered the important role of microglia cells in protecting a mouse brain’s central nervous system from viral infections that entered the brain through the nose.Despite entering the body through the nose — which gives a pathogen a direct route to the brain via olfactory neurons — many viruses rarely manage to cause fatal damage in the brain. Researchers at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health wanted to figure out why that’s the case. In a new study published recently in Science Immunology, they infected mice with a respiratory virus called vesicular stomatitis virus to track the immune system’s response.“You’re not trying to find out why the system [is] broken — the system usually works,” said Ashley Moseman, an assistant professor at Duke University School of Medicine and a co-author of the study. Past studies have shown that the brain can expel a virus without killing many of its own finite number of neurons, but they wanted to pinpoint how that process occurs.advertisement Privacy Policy Please enter a valid email address. By Theresa Gaffney June 12, 2020 Reprints [email protected] The research has no immediate clinical implications, but scientists hope it will spark more study of how the brain protects itself and how those natural defenses could be enhanced. Many researchers are particularly interested in a possible connection to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that leads to Covid-19.Loss of smell and taste are major symptoms of Covid-19, demonstrating a potential interference in the brain when infected. But experts said it’s also still unclear whether SARS-CoV-2 can enter the brain through neurons in the nose and, if so, how that might be prevented.The findings are an important step toward researching possible interventions for when the brain’s defense system doesn’t work, said Ari Waisman, chair and professor of immunology at University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, who wasn’t involved in the research. He said there is now a question of whether the mechanism this study revealed, which occurs after the virus has infected the central nervous system, could be manipulated to happen earlier to protect the brain from other pathogen invasions.“Microglia has a lot of roles in antiviral infection that were not appreciated before,” said Waisman.While the study sheds light on the brain’s successful self-defense, it’s important to emphasize that this process occurs when the virus is already in the body and in the brain, Moseman said.“If you’re trying to prevent invasion in the first place, you should consider the surface that is going to be invaded,” he said. “Once you get infected, you have to deal with the consequences one way or the other.” Multimedia Producer Related: Leave this field empty if you’re human: “We don’t want T cells to go into the brain and kill things that they aren’t supposed to kill,” said Moseman. So, he said, the microglia “acquire antigen in a way that allows them to present antigen in the area, but avoid some of these tricky situations.”advertisement Their research found an unlikely hero: microglia. Microglial cells in the brain are not infected themselves by invading viruses. Rather, the study found that microglia actually find antigens — the toxins a virus gives off in the brain — and present them to the T cells that need to kill them.center_img Theresa Gaffney and Hyacinth Empinado/STAT As biotech drifts from amyloid hypothesis for Alzheimer’s, some see reason to cling on NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. The team observed the process between microglia and T cells by using a virus that would leave a stain to show everywhere it’s been, allowing them to see all the cells that survived infection. They used microscopes to observe the live cells interacting — red-colored T cells flashed green when they came in contact with microglia and killed the antigen.Later in the study, the team infected mice again, this time after reducing microglia in their brain. Under the microscope, they observed that T cells were less likely to recognize antigens when microglia were fewer. The mice also had reduced survival rates with lower counts of microglia, demonstrating how critical a role this cell type plays in the brain’s protection.The researchers do not know how microglia are affected after a T cell kills the antigen. The encounter might kill microglia, too, but the stakes are lower, according to Moseman. Microglia can regenerate in ways that central nervous system neurons cannot. But it’s still an important question to ask, Moseman said, because what happens to microglia could have implications about how in control they are of T cells during this process. How the (mouse) brain’s viral defense system worksVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2020/06/12/how-some-cells-serve-as-unlikely-heroes-to-defend-the-brain-from-viral-invaders/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0000:5300:53  About the Author Reprints Theresa Gaffney In the LabWatch: How some cells serve as unlikely heroes to defend the brain from viral invaders Tags researchlast_img read more

New lawyers join OSC committee

first_img The Ontario Securities Commission (OSC) announced today that three lawyers have been added to the Securities Proceedings Advisory Committee (SPAC). The SPAC provides input on the operation of the tribunal that hears enforcement cases and other proceedings.The three new members of the SPAC are: Lara Jackson from Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP; David Conklin of Goodmans LLP; and Brad Moore of Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP. High angle view of mallet eyeglasses legal book in courtroom andreypopov/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitter James Langton The SPAC provides advice to the commission on both policy and procedural issues involving the hearings that take place before the OSC’s administrative tribunal, including enforcement proceedings and other issues that are considered by the commission. Among other functions, the SPAC gives the commission feedback on proposed revisions to its practice guidelines, procedural rules and administrative policies “to ensure fairness, transparency and accessibility,” according to the OSC.Members of the committee serve three-year terms, which are staggered to prevent excessive turnover in any one year. There are currently 12 lawyers in private practice sitting on the SPAC, along with representatives from the OSC’s enforcement department and its secretary’s office. The group is chaired by Grace Knakowski, who is corporate secretary of the OSC. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Companies Ontario Securities Commission last_img read more

UNRWA mobile health clinic brings a sign of hope to devastated Yarmouk camp

first_imgUNRWA mobile health clinic brings a sign of hope to devastated Yarmouk camp UNRWA“I had tears in my eyes when I heard that UNRWA started returning services to my camp. I had to flee from Palestine as a young woman in 1948, to Lebanon first, and then to Syria. Before, I lived a beautiful life in Saffuriya, close to Nazareth, and I still remember the smells and the colours of all the orange and olive groves.Yarmouk then became a second home for me, and UNRWA part of my life. When the war started, I felt like every bomb, every explosion took away some hope. I was devastated when I saw Yarmouk in ruins, not even a shadow of the vibrant camp it was before. All that was left was rubble, shells of buildings that look like ghosts during the night. My family was torn apart, most of them fled the country. But I didn’t want to leave. I refuse to move again, unless it is back to my homeland. I will die here or in Palestine. And I live with my memories.”Ninety-year-old Khadraa Mohammad al-Mawed, known as Hajjeh Umm Subhi, is the oldest member of one of the approximately 430 families currently living in the camp. Many of them returned because they cannot afford increasing rents anymore. Living conditions inside Yarmouk are however still incredibly difficult, with no services available until very recently.UNRWA, in an effort to offer services to particularly vulnerable persons in Yarmouk, has worked closely with the General Authority for Palestine Arab Refugees (GAPAR) to resume essential primary health care and disease prevention in Yarmouk. As of 23 September, a mobile health clinic – one of the Agency’s 25 primary health-care facilities across Syria – is visiting the camp every Wednesday to provide services from the yard of one of the destroyed UNRWA schools. “I am very excited to see the clinic. UNRWA already provides transportation for the children so they can go to school. I hope they will soon be able to go to a school in the camp, and that we will have a real clinic. But this is a beginning, it makes us feel that we are not forgotten. And I don’t have to pay expensive transportation fees anymore to get my checkups and medical care outside the camp. It was also very tiring for me,” Umm Subhi said. She suffers from diabetes, coronary heart disease and joint pains. With the needed health services now close to her home, she is also better protected from COVID-19 and doesn’t have to take unnecessary risks by using public transportation. “We also received food, blankets and kitchen utensils from UNRWA some weeks ago, for the first time in many years the distribution took place inside the camp,” she added, with a smile on her face.“We were able to treat about 900 patients over the past weeks in our clinic. Every Wednesday, we can receive an average of 65 patients, many of them with chronic diseases and respiratory infections,” says Dr. Imad Hamdan, an UNRWA doctor who works in the clinic.”I think many older persons avoided seeking health care before, as it was too difficult to access. It is heartbreaking to see the conditions they are living in and it makes us very happy to see their sparkling eyes when they come to us. It means a lot to them, not only to get health care, but also just to be able to talk. We are like a family to them. It is a tiny bit of normality that came back. We also believe that sometimes symptoms they show are triggered by fear and stress, after the horrors and atrocities they went through.”Dr. Hamdan also highlighted the important role the clinic plays in awareness-raising and explaining preventative measures to avoid the spread of COVID-19 in the camp. “It would be a catastrophe here, people in Yarmouk cannot bear any additional burden,” he said. “What they need now is hope. Life needs to return to Yarmouk camp, I feel that our clinic is a start of this.”Before the beginning of the conflict in March 2011, Yarmouk was home to approximately 160,000 Palestine refugees, making it the largest Palestine refugee community in Syria. Located eight kilometers from Damascus, it had a symbolic value for the Palestinian diaspora.In December 2012, fierce clashes erupted in Yarmouk, causing numerous civilian casualties, severe damage to property and the displacement of thousands of Palestine refugees and Syrians. The camp was under siege from July 2013, drastically restricting the entry of commercial and humanitarian goods. In January 2014, UNRWA had access to Yarmouk and conducted direct distribution to besieged Palestine refugees. The Agency continued distribution until April 2015, when armed opposition groups captured over 60 per cent of the camp, containing over 90 per cent of the remaining civilian population. This not only made UNRWA unable to carry out any distributions inside Yarmouk but also displaced most of the remaining 18,000 Palestine refugees and other civilians to the neighbouring areas of Yalda, Babila and Beit Saham (YBB).Later in 2015, UNRWA managed to access the remaining 6,000 Palestine refugees in Yarmouk and YBB through cross-border missions to Yalda and continued until May 2016 when access was blocked. Almost all the remaining Palestine refugees left during the final government offensive for Yarmouk in April-May 2018, after which the government retook control of the camp left in ruins.Due to the Agency’s unprecedented financial crisis, critical health-care services like those extended to the returned Palestine refugees in Yarmouk are now in jeopardy, putting #PalestineRefugeesAtRisk. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:children, chronic disease, community, covid-19, Damascus, explosion, Government, health services, heart disease, Humanitarian, lebanon, offensive, Palestine, Palestinian, property, Syria, UNRWAlast_img read more

Western Australia coronovirus update as at 23 May 2021

first_imgWestern Australia coronovirus update as at 23 May 2021 The Department of Health has reported no new cases of COVID-19 overnight.The State’s total remains at 1016.WA Health is monitoring three active cases of COVID-19 – 1004 people have recovered from the virus in WA.To date, the WA Department of Health has administered 147,473 COVID-19 vaccinations, including 34,659 people who have received both doses. Yesterday, 1685 people were vaccinated.The Commonwealth Government vaccination national roll-out figures can be found on the Australian Department of Health website (external site).Yesterday, 287 people were assessed for testing and swabbed at WA Health COVID clinics.To date, 96 cases of variant strains have been detected in Western Australia – 53 of the B.1.1.7 strain, 15 of the B.1.351 strain, 27 of the B.1.617 strain (Indian variant) and one of the P1 variant (Brazilian variant).Visit WA Health’s HealthyWA website for the latest information on COVID-19. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, commonwealth, covid-19, Department of Health, Government, health, testing, vaccination, vaccinations, virus, visit, WA, WA Health, website, Western Australialast_img read more

Statement By Chancellor Richard L. Byyny Regarding the Coroner's Report on the Death of Lynn Gordon Bailey Jr.

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The coroner’s report concerning the death of Lynn Gordon Bailey Jr., as well as recent events at several other universities, tragically underscores the dangers associated with the misuse and abuse of alcohol. We are committed to doing everything we can to prevent such a tragedy from happening again. As announced last week, I have asked our campus and the Boulder community to launch a concerted attack on the misuse and abuse of alcohol, including intensified educational programming throughout our students’ college careers. We also are reviewing all aspects of Greek life, including the role of alcohol at social events. We recognize that we face difficult challenges in addressing the issue of alcohol abuse, but we must persevere — with the help of the entire campus and Boulder communities. —- Related Information: Chancellor’s State of the Campus Address: Remarks on Alcohol Issues CU-Boulder Administration Announces Early Responses To CU Student Death Statement On CU-Boulder Student Death By Chancellor Richard L. Byyny Published: Oct. 3, 2004 last_img read more

1mg collaborates with HSCC and Seekify to expand vaccinator base for scaling up COVID-19 vaccination

first_img Share MaxiVision Eye Hospitals launches “Mucormycosis Early Detection Centre” Read Article Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals releases first “Comprehensive Textbook of COVID-19” Add Comment The missing informal workers in India’s vaccine story Adoption of AI/ML can disrupt healthcare services 1mg collaborates with HSCC and Seekify to expand vaccinator base for scaling up COVID-19 vaccination By EH News Bureau on May 13, 2021 WHO tri-regional policy dialogue seeks solutions to challenges facing international mobility of health professionals Phoenix Business Consulting invests in telehealth platform Healpha Related Posts Comments (0) News 1MGCOVID-19 vaccinationFICCIHealthcare Sector Skill CouncilSeekify According to a FICCI-E&Y report ‘Protecting India: Public Private Partnership for vaccinating against COVID-19,’ one lakh healthcare professionals (as inoculators) and two lakh support staff/volunteers would be required to vaccinate the entire adult population1mg has partnered with Healthcare Sector Skill Council (HSCC) and Seekify to launch a programme to provide adequate skills training to healthcare professionals (medical students, nursing students, pharmacists, phlebotomists, etc.) in the administration of COVID-19 vaccination.With the second wave of COVID-19 causing widespread loss of lives, scaling up vaccination drives is the dire need of the hour to reduce hospitalisations and deaths. According to the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI)- Ernst & Young (E&Y) report ‘Protecting India: Public Private Partnership for vaccinating against COVID-19,’ one lakh healthcare professionals (as inoculators) and two lakh support staff/volunteers would be required to vaccinate the entire adult population.With the acute pressure on the existing healthcare infrastructure and professionals, there is an immediate need to prepare a second line of inoculators among allied health professionals. A series of noteworthy decisions have recently been taken by the Central Government in this regard. On 3rd May 2021, it was announced that medical interns, final year MBBS students, BSC/GNM nurses could be deployed to reduce the workload on existing doctors engaged in COVID-19 duty.Speaking about this, Dr Thomas Davis, Director – Standards and Industry Engagement, Health Sector Skill Council, said, “There is an urgent need to expand the pool of trained vaccinators in the country. Given the strain on our healthcare infrastructure, this initiative will help in training thousands of healthcare workers and preparing them in the fight against COVID-19.”Adding to it, Dr Varun Gupta, SVP, Medical Affairs, 1mg, said, “1mg’s training programme for vaccinators has been designed with experts, and has modules on basics of vaccination, how it is to be administered, standard precautions to be taken, monitoring of side effects following immunisation and operational guidelines of the government. Post completion of these training modules, candidates would have to undergo an assessment by the Health Sector Skill Council and only successful candidates will be issued certification from HSSC and 1mg. Five hundred healthcare workers have already been trained under this programme, 1mg aims to train 10,000 professionals by collaborating with medical, nursing and pharmacy colleges.” Menopause to become the next game-changer in global femtech solutions industry by 2025last_img read more

JDF Hailed as Defender of Democracy

first_imgFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Minister of National Security, Hon. Peter Bunting, is hailing the Jamaica Defence Force (JDF) as an invaluable institution, noting that as the country’s last line of defence, it can be regarded as the ultimate guarantor of Jamaica’s sovereignty and democracy. The Minister was speaking at the 45th staging of the Jamaica Regiment’s Victoria Cross dinner on Friday (May 25), at the Jamaica Officers Club at Up Park Camp. He said that as Jamaica celebrates its 50th anniversary of Independence this year, it is fortunate to have an institution like the JDF, which is also celebrating its jubilee year. In addition to defending the country’s borders and helping to restore and maintain law and order, Mr. Bunting said the force is also instrumental in humanitarian and disaster relief operations, noting that the JDF was among the first respondents on the ground in the aftermath of the devastating January 2010 earthquake in Haiti. The Minister noted further that the JDF boasts high-quality soldiers and officers, who are not only warriors but gifted scholars as well. “I have encountered a thoroughly professional, bright, articulate, loyal and dedicated (group) and Jamaicans should recognise the treasure and valuable institution that exists in the JDF,” he stated. Mr. Bunting said he is “very proud to have this office as Minister of National Security” and to be of assistance to the various units that do yeoman service on behalf of the country. The Victoria Cross celebrations are customarily held during the latter part of May each yearto pay tribute to two soldiers, who were the first non-Europeans to be awarded Britain’s highest award for bravery in battle. To qualify for this award the soldier must render service in the face of enemy action, above and beyond the call of duty. The JDF has no living recipients of the Victoria Cross, but honours, as part of its heritage, the two West Indian soldiers: Sergeant William Gordon of Jamaica and Private Samuel Hodge of the Virgin Islands, who received this military decoration. They were decorated with the Victoria Cross for their great bravery on the battlefield during the 19th Century campaigns of West Africa, whilst serving in the West India Regiment. Sergeant William Gordon and Private Samuel Hodge had respectively enlisted in the first and fourth Battalions of the West India Regiment. JDF Hailed as Defender of Democracy National SecurityMay 28, 2012 RelatedJDF Hailed as Defender of Democracy RelatedJDF Hailed as Defender of Democracy By O. Rodger Hutchinson, JIS Reporter RelatedJDF Hailed as Defender of Democracy Advertisementslast_img read more

Santa Monica Man Pleads to Possessing Child Pornography

first_img James Bell says: It’s sad because he uses atheism to justify his behavior. HomeBad BehaviorSanta Monica Man Pleads to Possessing Child Pornography Sep. 25, 2019 at 5:10 amBad BehaviorBriefsCrimeNewsSanta Monica Man Pleads to Possessing Child PornographyGuest Author2 years agoangela brunsonchild pornographyCyber Crime Divisionguido germano A 59-year-old Santa Monica man entered a no contest plea today for possessing child pornography, the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office announced.Deputy District Attorney Angela Brunson of the Cyber Crime Division said Guido Germano entered the plea in case BA479645 to one felony count of possession of child or youth pornography.The defendant was immediately sentenced to five years of formal felony probation and ordered to attend a minimum of 52 weeks of sex offender counseling, forfeit devices which contained any child pornography images or videos and register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.Germano, who was the director of artificial intelligence medicine at a local hospital at the time, shared child pornography videos using peer-to-peer software and downloaded them onto his personal computer at his home, the prosecutor said.The case was investigated by the District Attorney’s Office, Bureau of Investigation.Submitted by Ricardo Santiago, Public Information OfficerTags :angela brunsonchild pornographyCyber Crime Divisionguido germanoshare on Facebookshare on Twittershow 1 comment September 26, 2019 at 6:46 PM Comments are closed. 1 Comment 2019 Suicide Prevention Report released to the CommunityLA considers limits on where homeless can campYou Might Also LikeFeaturedNewsBobadilla rejects Santa Monica City Manager positionMatthew Hall7 hours agoBriefsLos Angeles Sheriff’s deputy accused of destroying evidence of 2019 assaultAssociated Press11 hours agoBriefsCalifornia State Treasurer Fiona Ma to Speak at Online Santa Monica College Commencement Ceremony June 25Guest Author11 hours agoNewsBruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for moreAssociated Press18 hours agoNewsWedding boom is on in the US as vendors scramble to keep upAssociated Press18 hours agoNewsCouncil picks new City ManagerBrennon Dixson18 hours agolast_img read more