Manhattan-based asset manager, down on NYC, opens Miami office

first_imgMarathon Asset Management CEO Bruce Richards (Photos via Unsplash; CFA Society NY)As lockdowns continue to affect New York, Marathon Asset Management is setting up an office in Miami.While the investing team will remain in New York, the new Miami office will be available for all other personnel.Read moreNew Yorkers snap up high-end rentals in Miami BeachFollowing the money, NY brokers seek licenses in other statesReturn to the office? Manhattan workers say no thanks Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink TagsMiamiNYC Office Market Share via Shortlink “Marathon South will be an option for our employees,” co-founder and CEO Bruce Richards said Wednesday in an interview on Bloomberg Television.ADVERTISEMENT“I’m certainly committed to New York City,” Richards added. “I love New York City.”But he also said, “New York City is not what it once was” and predicted vacancy rates would rise and things would get “ugly” for property owners.Richards said that lower taxes and less crime make other cities like Atlanta, Nashville and Charlotte attractive alternatives.New York claims to be the safest big city in the U.S., and while much attention has been paid to a 38 percent rise in murders this year, NYPD data through Nov. 1 shows overall crime is down by 1 percent year-to-date.Balyasny Asset Management and Bluecrest Capital Management have also established offices outside of New York amid the pandemic, as companies struggle to get employees to return to Manhattan offices.[Bloomberg] — Sasha Joneslast_img read more

Climate change will severely affect US economy, particularly in Midwest

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) —  A newly released report issued by 13 federal agencies on Friday explains in great depth the potential consequences of climate change on the United States and warns that neglecting to take action could drastically impede economic growth over the next century.The report, written with the help of over 1,000 people, including about 300 scientists from outside the government, indicates that climate change could have a significant impact on trade and overseas operations.The report lays out the impacts of climate change on natural resources and environmental services in U.S. territories from Puerto Rico to the country’s Midwest region, which comprises 18 percent of the country’s GDP through agricultural production.The findings also aggressively dispute President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that climate change is a “hoax.”“Brutal and Extended Cold Blast could shatter ALL RECORDS — Whatever happened to Global Warming?” Trump tweeted in response to the record-breaking temperatures that were expected during Thanksgiving. Despite the president’s sentiments on climate change, the extensive report suggests that with the absence of global mitigation, the effects of climate change will only get worse.Here’s a closer look:Who will it affect?“This will have an impact everywhere in the country,” said Andrew Light, professor of philosophy, public policy and atmospheric sciences, and director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy at George Mason University.Although climate change is expected to affect the country as a whole, there are a few communities who will feel the effects the most, the report said, including people who are already living in low-income and marginalized communities.“Low-income communities and some communities of color are often already overburdened with poor environmental conditions and are disproportionately affected by, and less resilient to, the health impacts of climate change,” the report stated.Native American and Alaskan Native communities, for example, are in danger of increased health risks because of some traditional food and practices, damage to water and sanitation systems, decreased food security and new infectious diseases.Other vulnerable populations include minority groups, people in high-income regions, women and people with mental illnesses since they all lack the resources and information needed to safeguard themselves from the risks of climate change, the report said.“The findings in the Trump administration’s NCA report show how the health and daily lives of Americans are becoming more and more interrupted because of climate change. Communities of color and those on the front lines feel these impacts the hardest and we feel them first,” Dr. Beverly Wright, the founding director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, said in a press release.“We challenge the administration to finally begin using this information to rebuild and strengthen the communities in the direct path of the atrocities wrought by the fossil fuel industry and decades of poor policies that have neglected our concerns,” she continued. Trade impactsThe report concluded that rising temperatures, rising sea levels, and changes in extreme events are expected to “increasingly disrupt” and “critically damage” infrastructure and labor productivity, affecting import and export prices.Extreme climate disasters could hinder factory production in both the United States and abroad, resulting in price increases in products and crops. According to the report, American businesses rely so heavily on production and supply chains overseas that there wouldn’t be an industry that goes unaffected.The Midwest region is expected to be hit the hardest, with higher temperatures, drought and flooding contributing to a decline in soybeans and corn — two of the Midwest’s main commodities, the report said. As a result, the region could potentially produce less than 75 percent of the corn it currently produces, and lose more than 25 percent of its soybean yield.To combat this issue, scientists stressed effectively planning and implementing strategies that reduce risk or adapt to the changing environment. Health risksFrequent changes in temperature and increased air pollution from wildfires and ozone pollution could cause health issues to surge.“Rising air and water temperatures and more intense extreme events are expected to increase exposure to waterborne and foodborne diseases, affecting food and water safety,” the report said.Those with allergy-related illnesses, like asthma and hay fever, could see an increase in severity because of climate change, it said.Although the report suggests that no one is immune to the effects of climate change, children, low-income communities and older adults are groups that face higher risks of health issues due to factors such as increased temperatures.The report predicts the Midwest will be largely impacted by increased temperatures, resulting in 2,000 premature deaths by 2090.“Adaptation and mitigation policies and programs that help individuals, communities, and states prepare for the risks of a changing climate reduce the number of injuries, illnesses and deaths from climate-related health outcomes,” the report stated. The resolutionThe scientists who worked on the report implored the U.S. not to ignore greenhouse gas emissions, which are expected to cause “substantial net damage” to the country’s economy throughout the century.“With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic sectors are projected to reach hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century — more than the current gross domestic product of many U.S. states,” the report concluded.Trump has praised the use of fossil fuels in the past, and the administration stood by this on Friday.“The United States leads the world in providing affordable, abundant, and secure energy to our citizens, while also leading the world in reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions,” White House Deputy Press Secretary Lindsay Walters told ABC News in response to the study. “The report is largely based on the most extreme scenario, which contradicts long-established trends by assuming that, despite strong economic growth that would increase greenhouse gas emissions, there would be limited technology and innovation, and a rapidly expanding population.”But scientists who have reviewed the report had different views, and backed the report’s findings.“I can only hope the president accepts this report,” Kim Knowlton, deputy director of the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a teleconference call. “Our actions are the result of climate change, but our actions will be the solution.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.(WASHINGTON) —  A newly released report issued by 13 federal agencies on Friday explains in great depth the potential consequences of climate change on the United States and warns that neglecting to take action could drastically impede economic growth over the next century.The report, written with the help of over 1,000 people, including about 300 scientists from outside the government, indicates that climate change could have a significant impact on trade and overseas operations.The report lays out the impacts of climate change on natural resources and environmental services in U.S. territories from Puerto Rico to the country’s Midwest region, which comprises 18 percent of the country’s GDP through agricultural production.The findings also aggressively dispute President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that climate change is a “hoax.”“Brutal and Extended Cold Blast could shatter ALL RECORDS — Whatever happened to Global Warming?” Trump tweeted in response to the record-breaking temperatures that were expected during Thanksgiving. https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1065400254151954432Despite the president’s sentiments on climate change, the extensive report suggests that with the absence of global mitigation, the effects of climate change will only get worse.Here’s a closer look: Who will it affect?“This will have an impact everywhere in the country,” said Andrew Light, professor of philosophy, public policy and atmospheric sciences, and director of the Institute for Philosophy and Public Policy at George Mason University.Although climate change is expected to affect the country as a whole, there are a few communities who will feel the effects the most, the report said, including people who are already living in low-income and marginalized communities.“Low-income communities and some communities of color are often already overburdened with poor environmental conditions and are disproportionately affected by, and less resilient to, the health impacts of climate change,” the report stated.Native American and Alaskan Native communities, for example, are in danger of increased health risks because of some traditional food and practices, damage to water and sanitation systems, decreased food security and new infectious diseases.Other vulnerable populations include minority groups, people in high-income regions, women and people with mental illnesses since they all lack the resources and information needed to safeguard themselves from the risks of climate change, the report said.“The findings in the Trump administration’s NCA report show how the health and daily lives of Americans are becoming more and more interrupted because of climate change. Communities of color and those on the front lines feel these impacts the hardest and we feel them first,” Dr. Beverly Wright, the founding director of the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, said in a press release.“We challenge the administration to finally begin using this information to rebuild and strengthen the communities in the direct path of the atrocities wrought by the fossil fuel industry and decades of poor policies that have neglected our concerns,” she continued. Trade impactsThe report concluded that rising temperatures, rising sea levels, and changes in extreme events are expected to “increasingly disrupt” and “critically damage” infrastructure and labor productivity, affecting import and export prices.Extreme climate disasters could hinder factory production in both the United States and abroad, resulting in price increases in products and crops. According to the report, American businesses rely so heavily on production and supply chains overseas that there wouldn’t be an industry that goes unaffected.The Midwest region is expected to be hit the hardest, with higher temperatures, drought and flooding contributing to a decline in soybeans and corn — two of the Midwest’s main commodities, the report said. As a result, the region could potentially produce less than 75 percent of the corn it currently produces, and lose more than 25 percent of its soybean yield.To combat this issue, scientists stressed effectively planning and implementing strategies that reduce risk or adapt to the changing environment.  Health risksFrequent changes in temperature and increased air pollution from wildfires and ozone pollution could cause health issues to surge.“Rising air and water temperatures and more intense extreme events are expected to increase exposure to waterborne and foodborne diseases, affecting food and water safety,” the report said.Those with allergy-related illnesses, like asthma and hay fever, could see an increase in severity because of climate change, it said.Although the report suggests that no one is immune to the effects of climate change, children, low-income communities and older adults are groups that face higher risks of health issues due to factors such as increased temperatures.The report predicts the Midwest will be largely impacted by increased temperatures, resulting in 2,000 premature deaths by 2090.“Adaptation and mitigation policies and programs that help individuals, communities, and states prepare for the risks of a changing climate reduce the number of injuries, illnesses and deaths from climate-related health outcomes,” the report stated. The resolutionThe scientists who worked on the report implored the U.S. not to ignore greenhouse gas emissions, which are expected to cause “substantial net damage” to the country’s economy throughout the century.“With continued growth in emissions at historic rates, annual losses in some economic sectors are projected to reach hundreds of billions of dollars by the end of the century — more than the current gross domestic product of many U.S. states,” the report concluded.Trump has praised the use of fossil fuels in the past, and the administration stood by this on Friday.“The United States leads the world in providing affordable, abundant, and secure energy to our citizens, while also leading the world in reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions,” White House Deputy Press Secretary Lindsay Walters told ABC News in response to the study. “The report is largely based on the most extreme scenario, which contradicts long-established trends by assuming that, despite strong economic growth that would increase greenhouse gas emissions, there would be limited technology and innovation, and a rapidly expanding population.”But scientists who have reviewed the report had different views, and backed the report’s findings.“I can only hope the president accepts this report,” Kim Knowlton, deputy director of the Natural Resources Defense Council, said in a teleconference call. “Our actions are the result of climate change, but our actions will be the solution.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Claude Onesta is MIZUNO WORLD HANDBALL COACH 2015!

first_imgShareTweetShareShareEmailCommentsClaude Onesta is MIZUNO WORLD HANDBALL COACH 2015! Amazing achievements of golden French generation is praised by the Jury consisted from the 29 handball journalists all over the world and handball fans, who were the last member of Jury.The 58-years old French coach is on the bench of the national team since 2001. A lot of major trophies are linked with his coaching knowledge, the last one, at World Championship 2015 in Qatar, where the “Experts” continued with their golden era.Onesta joined his player Nikola Karabatić on the throne in 2015 in Contest organized by Handball-Planet.comThe previous winners were Dagur Sigurdsson – 2011 (Fuchse Berlin), Alfred Gislason 2012-2013 (THW Kiel) and Ljubomir Vranješ – 2014.RESULTSVOTING PROCESSHandball-Planet team want to thank all media, teams, TOP players, coaches and handball fans worldwide for making our project so big this year! According to fantastic experience in the last three weeks, HP will soon announce the nominations for the MIZUNO World FEMALE HANDBALL PLAYER 2015. Pingback: Golden Era of Claude Onesta | Handball Planet Pingback: Klod Onesta je najbolji trener planete u 2015. godini! | Balkan Handball Related Items:Claude Onesta MIZUNO WOrld Handball coach 2015 4 Comments Leave a Reply Cancel replyYour email address will not be published.Comment Name Email Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img Pingback: Onesta calls French stars for EHF EURO 2016! | Handball Planet Pingback: MIZUNO WORLD COACH 2015 in Women’s Handball: Adžić beats Hergeirsson | Handball Planet ShareTweetShareShareEmail 4 Commentslast_img read more

Bullins to follow Blaney to Penske, Erwin to crew chief Menard in 2018

first_imgRELATED: Blaney to drive third Penske car in 2018, Menard moving to Wood BrothersOnly hours after announcing new drivers for the 2018 season, both Team Penske and Wood Brothers Racing confirmed Wednesday the crew chiefs that will guide both cars.Crew chief Jeremy Bullins will join driver Ryan Blaney with the new No. 12 Team Penske entry next year. The two are currently working together on the Wood Brothers No. 21 Ford and have been longtime compatriots in Blaney’s career.Wood Brothers co-owner Eddie Wood confirmed that veteran Greg Erwin will serve as crew chief on Paul Menard’s No. 21 Ford in 2018.RELATED: Bullins’ stats as a crew chief | Erwin’s crew chief statsAll involved say it was a natural and easy progression for the pairings.“To work with Jeremy pretty much ever since I got here, to work with him on the XFINITY cars over to Cup cars and get to know him personally has been really beneficial,’” said Blaney, who currently drives the No. 21 Wood Brothers Ford, that Menard will take over next year.“I think it says a lot when you can have a crew chief that you are personal friends with because you have that relationship and can communicate so easily. I think if you build that relationship, it makes you faster and better at the race track where you can figure things out. You get to know how they think.“It’s been amazing to have him ever since my career got started and hopefully I can carry on with that for a long time.”RELATED: Wood Brothers Racing through the years | 21 photos of the iconic No. 21 carThe Wood Brothers were equally as optimistic about pairing Erwin with Menard.  Erwin is currently the crew chief of the No. 22 NASCAR XFINITY Series car for Team Penske (Brian Wilson will handle crew chief duties on the No. 22 XFINITY team in 2018) and has a wealth of experience atop the pit box in the NASCAR national series. “He’s already in the Penske fold and that worked really well with Jeremy already having experience over here and knowing all the protocol and the way they conduct meetings and things they do behind the scenes,” Wood said. “Greg has already been a part of that. Len and I spent some time around Greg when he was over at Roush Fenway and got to know him so we’re looking forward to that.”Menard said he actually has a previous working relationship with Irwin, one that dates all the way back to the early-2000s when he substituted a few times for driver Robby Gordon – whom Irwin worked with in 2005-06.“I’ve known Greg since his Robby Gordon days,” added Menard, who moves to the Wood Brothers after spending the last seven years driving the No. 27 Richard Childress Chevrolet.“I drove Robby’s car and qualified it a couple times when Robby was down (racing) in Baja so I’ve worked with Greg in the past and spent some time with him here recently.“He’s a great guy and knows the systems over here.”last_img read more

Goodyear opts for slight change to tire for Charlotte road course

first_imgBROOKLYN, Mich. — Based on testing during successive weeks in July, Goodyear has opted to bring a slightly different tire for September’s Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series Playoff race at the Charlotte Motor Speedway road course.Goodyear is treating the Bank of America Roval 400 as a typical road course race, although the track configuration that includes the majority of the banked oval (with chicanes) and an infield portion will be raced for the first time.RELATED: Charlotte road course distance finalized | Scenes from the road course test“When we got to the organizational test (in July), we started seeing some heat that we didn’t really expect, to be quite honest with you,” said Greg Stucker, Goodyear’s director of race tire sales. “I think it’s like anything — as you go from test to test to test, everybody gets a little faster.“We saw enough signs in the first week of the organizational test that we decided to bring some of the controls (control tires) from our March test back and evaluate that as well, which we did in the second week (July 17). “We felt like that was going to be a better choice for the race. The difference between the two is really a minor formulation change in the tread compound. It might have a little less grip, although when we did back-to-backs, nobody could really tell any difference. It’s just a slight change, back to where we were in March, and we felt like that was the right choice.”MORE: Tricky spots abound at road course | Take a lap around the courseGoodyear will also bring rain tires to Charlotte — just in case. The rain tires are no different from those used at other road courses on the Cup circuit.last_img read more

New Hospital Beds Speak 13 Languages

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreNot only can these new hospital beds talk, they speak 13 languages. The beds have the brains of a computer and can communicate 30 programmed questions and commands that help care for patients who don’t speak the native tongue. (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

8-year-old Raises Money for Guatemala Schools

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreEight-year-old Marissa Alterio’s appeal in front of the congregation of the Fairfield Presbyterian Church affected one parishioner so much that he walked up to her and emptied his wallet, handing the young girl $85.“It was all the money in his wallet,” said Marissa, who has since gone on to collect close to $1,000 to help buy school supplies later this month for the students of two schools in her grandmother’s native land of Guatemala.(READ the story in the Daily Republic)Thanks to C. Michael McGinley for submitting the link on our Facebook Page!File Photo credit: prendio2 / CCAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Wheels Manufacturing adds Dropout-E to extend any hanger to fit bigger gears

first_imgMachined from 6061 aluminum, the adapter includes a steel fixing bolt and comes in an anodized black finish for $18.wheelsmfg.com While this isn’t a new concept, it is a new product for Wheels Manufacturing. Much like the Wolf Tooth Components RoadLink, the Wheels Manufacturing Dropout-E is here to make your pedaling a bit easier – or at least allow you to run a larger cassette.The idea is pretty simple. The Dropout-E extends the derailleur position by 21mm to allow for more clearance to run a larger rear cog. Designed to work with every standard derailleur hanger and rear derailleur, the adapter bolts to the derailleur hanger, and then the derailleur bolts to the adapter.When used in a 1x set up, Dropout-E will allow for up to a 42t max rear cog. For double or triple cranksets, the adapter will allow for up to a 40t max cog. And if you’re the Campagnolo type, the adapter will allow for a 36t max cog with any Campagnolo crankset.last_img read more

Family Law Scetion donates Marital and Family Law Review Course books

first_img October 15, 2015 Regular News Family Law Scetion donates Marital and Family Law Review Course books THE FAMILY LAW SECTION donated copies of its 2015 Marital and Family Law Review Course books to each member of the Legal Aid Foundation of the Tallahassee Bar Association’s second Thunderdome class, a hands-on legal group training program to provide education, mentoring, networking, and leadership to a new generation of lawyers serving Leon County. From the left are John Williams, Thunderdome mentor; William “Bill” Wallis, Thunderdome participant; Beth Anne Trombetta, Family Law Section administrator; Darby Kerrigan Scott, executive director of the Legal Aid Foundation; and Sean Desmond, a Thunderdome mentor. The Tallahassee Bar has recently established a Lifetime Professionalism Award to honor lawyers, judges, or law professors who have demonstrated professionalism and dedication to the legal profession and legal community for a period of at least 25 years through civil, community, or legal service. Nominees must be members of the Tallahassee Bar. Nomination forms are available online at TallahasseeBar.org and are due by November 9. For more information, visit TallahasseeBar.org or contact Joann Gore at 850-702-5008 or [email protected]last_img read more

Garcia joins Bar Foundation as director of pro bono partnerships

first_imgGarcia joins Bar Foundation as director of pro bono partnerships Garcia joins Bar Foundation as director of pro bono partnerships Ericka Garcia has joined The Florida Bar Foundation staff to support local and statewide efforts to expand pro bono partnerships with bar associations, law firms, courts, law schools, and legal aid organizations. As director of pro bono partnerships, Garcia will collaborate with The Florida Bar Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services, the Florida Commission on Access to Civil Justice, The Florida Bar, the Florida Pro Bono Coordinators Association, Florida Bar Foundation grantee organizations, and other groups to implement an expanded vision for pro bono in Florida. Kathleen McLeroy, co-chair of The Florida Bar’s Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services and a past president of the Foundation, served on the search committee that selected Garcia. “We are extremely fortunate to have Ericka Garcia in this new role at the Foundation,” McLeroy said. “She brings a wealth of experience in working with pro bono attorneys, creating and growing projects, and generating enthusiasm and buy-in. As we work through the standing committee to continue to promote and support pro bono in Florida, I am grateful that the Foundation has provided us with such a wonderful resource and partner.” Garcia comes to the Foundation from the Legal Aid Society of the Orange County Bar Association, which she joined in 2009 as an Equal Justice Works Fellow supported by the Foundation and the law firm Greenberg Traurig. There, she advocated as a guardian ad litem attorney for dependent children with developmental disabilities and recently had taken on added responsibilities related to development and grant administration. “We have no doubt that Ericka’s leadership in this position will be transformational for pro bono in Florida,” Foundation CEO Bruce Blackwell said. “She has demonstrated the ability to create a vision, establish connections, attract support and make great things happen, and we are thrilled to have her join our high-performing staff.” Garcia said her new position merges her passion for legal services and pro bono with a shared vision for improving the lives of the less fortunate. “One cannot thrive, in most cases, without the other,” said Garcia, who has begun traveling the state to meet with pro bono and legal services leaders to gather information and establish partnerships. “I am beginning to learn more about the exciting pro bono programs we have throughout the state and plan to collaborate with our partners to continue enhancing these programs statewide,” Garcia said. December 15, 2015 Regular Newslast_img read more