From ovary to uterus: studying the overlooked transport in between

first_img By Ike Swetlitz Feb. 7, 2017 Reprints From ovary to uterus: studying the overlooked transport in between Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED In the Lab Alex Hogan/STAT What is it? Log In | Learn More Tags research STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Five years ago, in a laboratory in Durham, N.C., Joy Winuthayanon lost a mouse embryo and found her calling: studying the oviducts, oft-neglected in the research world of reproductive biology, yet essential for fertilized eggs to make it into the uterus. “Most of the people study the ovary or the uterus,” said Winuthayanon, an assistant professor of molecular bioscience at Washington State University. “And the oviduct is just kind of there, being a tube.” GET STARTEDlast_img read more