Rodrigo Lambre wins Grand Prix; Kevin Babington wins hearts

first_imgBrazilian rider Rodrigo Lambre topped the $214,000 Premier Equestrian Grand Prix CSIO4* riding Catover on Sunday, March 1, 2020, to conclude week eight of the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) in Wellington, FL.WEF continues at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center (PBIEC) through March 29, 2020, with 12 consecutive weeks of world-class competition and $13 million dollars on offer. The ninth week of competition, sponsored by Douglas Elliman Real Estate and recognized as a CSI5* and CSI2* by the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), runs from March 4 through 8.USA’s Ken Krome set a two-round track for 50 challengers in the final event of the week, and saw eight qualify for a tie-breaking jump-off. Lambre saved the best for last as the final jump-off rider. He and Catover were fast and precise to stop the clock double-clear in 37.73 seconds for the win over Ireland’s Shane Sweetnam and Chaqui Z in 38.29 seconds.“He is amazing,” said Lambre of Catover, an 11-year-old Holsteiner stallion (Catoki x Contact Me) owned by Mario Onate. “I have had him since he was eight, and I flat him almost every day but I’ve only actually been riding him seriously since October of last year in preparation for Tokyo. We all have Tokyo in mind this year; it’s our dream. It’s a difficult year to qualify for the team in every country, but we have also so many nations cups and so many shows that we can go in. It’s promising.”Of Catover, Lambre continued, “He’s not a really fast horse, but he has a huge stride. I think today was a jump-off that I could use that. I won doing the seven to the last jump, which for many horses was very far. The footing feels better for sure this year and, for me, if my horse is happy, I am happy.”Sweetnam and Chaqui Z, a 14-year-old Zangershiede stallion (Chacco Blue x Quinar Z) finished just off the pace for owner Spy Coast Farm LLC, but Sweetnam was pleased with the performance.“I was delighted with him. This is only his first time that he’s shown here this year, and it’s only his first real big class,” said Sweetnam. “He felt great, and I think his jump-off was excellent. Even though he’s 14, he feels like he’s eight. So, I’m really happy with where he is at the moment.”Finishing third in 39.08 seconds, Alexandra Thornton (GBR) is making her return to WEF after five years away from the North American show scene, saying, “I’ve been based in Europe since 2012, so it’s a long way to come. Last time I came, it was a completely different experience. The footing is amazing, which makes a world of difference for the horses. And actually I’ve extended my trip!”Thornton piloted Charielle, a 14-year-old Oldenburg mare (Chacco-Blue x Argentinus), which was originally sold to her by Lambre and is now owned by Dunwalke Ltd.“I don’t think he’s seen her live since I came and tried her in Mexico four or five years ago!” said Thornton, whose finish guaranteed her the Martha Jolicoeur Leading Lady Grand Prix Rider Award for week eight. “I think it’s really great that Martha offers this award for us. Female riders are often the minority in some of these grand prix classes, but there were three in the jump-off today who all rode fantastically. To win this award against them was really exciting.”Luis Pedro Biraben (ARG) finished in fourth riding Colorado 210 for owner Miguel Madero, while Israel’s Sydney Shulman rounded out the top five on J-Boston S.E., a horse she owns together with her mother Jill Shulman.Representing weekly sponsor Premier Equestrian, the company that installed the Auto Sport base mats geotextile for the new surface in the International Arena, Co-Founder and President Heidi Zorn was impressed with the talent showcased on Sunday afternoon.“The quality of riders, horses, and trainers here is supreme,” she said. “One of the main products that I think is making the biggest difference for them is the Auto Sport base mat, which is a mat underneath the footing’s surface which absorbs 40 to 50 percent of the concussion. I think that really helps the horses, especially these big jumpers on the down and the landing. They’ve got extra grip, and yet they’ve got the cushioning that they need.”Two special awards were presented during the final day of week eight. First, the Niall Grimes Perpetual Trophy was presented by Equestrian Sport Productions President Michael Stone, to Shane Sweetnam for the third consecutive year as the leading Irish rider during the CSIO week.Traditionally given to an international equestrian competing during CSIO week as recognition of style of riding and sportsmanship at WEF, the Kate Nash Boone Style Award was presented to Kevin Babington in recognition of Babington’s determination, inspiration, and dedication to show jumping after a life-changing event re-focused his role in the sport last year. (L-r) Dianna Babington, Kevin Babington, Michael Meller, and ringmaster Steve Rector. (Sportfot)Traditionally given to an international equestrian competing in the CSIO at WEF, the Kate Nash Boone Style Award was presented to Kevin Babington for 2020. A shift in the award’s honor, Michael Meller gave it in recognition of Babington’s determination, inspiration, and dedication to show jumping after a life-changing event re-focused his role in the sport last year.Final Results: $214,000 Premier Equestrian Grand Prix CSIO4*1. CATOVER: 2009 Holsteiner stallion by Catoki x Contact MeRODRIGO LAMBRE (BRA), Mario Onate: 0/0/37.732. CHAQUI Z: 2006 Zangersheide stallion by Chacco Blue x Quinar ZSHANE SWEETNAM (IRL), Spy Coast Farm LLC: 0/0/38.293. CHARIELLE: 2006 Oldenburg mare by Chacco-Blue x ArgentinusALEXANDRA THORNTON (GBR), Dunwalke Ltd.: 0/0/39.084. COLORADO 210: 2009 Westphalian gelding by Coronas x LenardoLUIS PEDRO BIRABEN (ARG), Miguel Madero & Luis Pedro Biraben: 0/0/40.425. J-BOSTON S.E.: 2009 BWP gelding by Boris van het KluizebosSYDNEY SHULMAN (ISR), Jill & Sydney Shulman: 0/4/37.556. CATOKI’S SON Z: 2009 Zangersheide gelding by Catoki x Aldo du ReverdyERYNN BALLARD (CAN), Ilan Ferder & Tal Milstein: 0/4/38.397. CARLOS JD Z: 2009 Zangersheide gelding by Canturo x BaloubetDARRAGH KERINS (IRL), NRG Farm LLC: 0/4/40.718. FABRICE DN: 2010 KWPN gelding by Gelha’s VDL Emilion Bloubet du RouetNICOLAS PIZARRO (MEX), Luis Alejandro Plascencia: 0/8/38.429. IDALVILLE D’ESPRIT: 2008 BWP gelding by Carabas van de wateringhoeve x Nabab de ReveERIC LAMAZE (CAN), Torrey Pines Stables Inc and Chris Stinett: 1/78.2910. HH CONRAD: 2005 Holsteiner stallion by Con Air x LocatoQUENTIN JUDGE (USA), Double H Farm: 4/74.04 Tags: WEF, show jumping, Winter Equestrian Festival, Kevin Babington, Rodrigo Lambre, Catover, $214000 Premier Equestrian Grand Prix CSIO4*, SIGN UP We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. Horse Sport Enews Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Email* More from News:MARS Bromont CCI Announces Requirements For US-Based RidersThe first set of requirements to allow American athletes and support teams to enter Canada for the June 2-6 competition have been released.Canadian Eventer Jessica Phoenix Reaches the 100 CCI4*-S MarkPhoenix achieved the milestone while riding Pavarotti at the inaugural 2021 CCI4*-S at the Land Rover Kentucky Three-Day Event.Tribunal Satisfied That Kocher Made Prolonged Use of Electric SpursAs well as horse abuse, the US rider is found to have brought the sport into disrepute and committed criminal acts under Swiss law.Washington International Horse Show Returns to TryonTIEC will again provide the venue for the WIHS Oct. 26-31 with a full schedule of hunter, jumper and equitation classes.last_img read more

Associate Dean for Clinical Education (GME)

first_imgPosting DetailsPosting NumberF00283PClassification TitleFacultyPosition TypeDisclaimerLiberty University’s hiring practices and EEO Statement are fullyin compliance with both federal and state law. Federal law createsan exception to the “religion” component of the employmentdiscrimination laws for religious organizations (includingeducational institutions), and permits them to give employmentpreference to members of their own religion. Liberty University isin that category.Position TitleAssociate Dean for Clinical Education (GME)Does this position require driving?YesContactRobbin Wright, Kaitlyn GenawayContact Phone Ext434-592-7657, 434-592-6515Contact [email protected], [email protected] Summary/Basic FunctionThe Associate Dean for Clinical Education is a member of theadministrative leadership team at Liberty University College ofOsteopathic Medicine ( LUCOM ). The Associate Dean works withstudents, faculty, Chairs, Assistant Deans, and the SeniorAssociate Dean for Clinical Affairs in the full spectrum ofclinical educational program development in medical educationincluding Undergraduate Medical Education ( UME ) (focusing onyears three and four of the medical school curriculum) and in thedevelopment, growth and management of GME programs.The administrative leadership work of the Associate Dean forClinical Education at LUCOM includes: leading and managing thedesign of clinical curriculum; implementing and delivering theclinical curriculum to continuously improve outcomes with faculty,Chairs, Assistant Deans, and administrative leaders; developing andimplementing best practices in community-based medical education;meeting and exceeding medical school and Graduate Medical Educationaccreditation requirements across clinical sites; and assistingwith recruiting and professionally developing the clinical facultyin community-based settings. The Associate Dean will work withsenior leadership to implement and develop core rotation sitesacross all specialties.The Associate Dean will work effectively with colleagues anddemonstrate versatility in these multiple roles as a collaborativeleader to continuously improve clinical educational metrics forstudents and LUCOM, including competency-based education outcomes,milestones, entrustable professional activities (EPAs), scores onlicensing examinations, and outcomes in the NRMP Match. TheAssociate Dean will also work to develop new Graduate MedicalEducation ( GME ) programs and grow established GME programs withthe Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs. Additional dutiesmay be assigned by the Dean or Senior Associate Dean for ClinicalAffairs.Minimum QualificationsEducation and Experience• Shall possess an earned D.O. or M.D. degree from an AmericanOsteopathic Association ( AOA ) or Liaison Committee on MedicalEducation ( LCME ) accredited college of osteopathic or allopathicmedicine.• An active medical license, current good standing and the abilityto obtain a medical license in Virginia.• Appropriate and current certification from either an AmericanOsteopathic Association or American Board of Medical Specialistcertification board.• Minimum of 5 years of academic leadership experience in thecontext of a medical school environment as a Department Chair,Assistant or Associate Dean, GME Program Director, or equivalentexperience in UME or GME .• Track record demonstrating leadership, achievement, and outcomesat an accredited medical school.• Demonstration of sustained professional engagement with facultyand activities demonstrating leadership of Chairs and faculty at amedical school.• Demonstrations of scholarly activity including publications,research activities, service to public or profession.Preferred QualificationsEducation and Experience• Shall possess an earned D.O. or M.D. degree from an AmericanOsteopathic Association ( AOA ) or Liaison Committee on MedicalEducation ( LCME ) accredited college of osteopathic or allopathicmedicine.• An active medical license, current good standing and the abilityto obtain a medical license in Virginia.• Appropriate and current certification from either an AmericanOsteopathic Association or American Board of Medical Specialistcertification board.• Minimum of 5 years of academic leadership experience in thecontext of a medical school environment as a Department Chair,Assistant or Associate Dean, GME Program Director, or equivalentexperience in UME or GME .• Track record demonstrating leadership, achievement, and outcomesat an accredited medical school.• Demonstration of sustained professional engagement with facultyand activities demonstrating leadership of Chairs and faculty at amedical school.• Demonstrations of scholarly activity including publications,research activities, service to public or profession.Work Hours8:00 am to 5:00 pmPosting Date03/31/2021Special Instructions for ApplicantsQuicklinkhttps://jobs.liberty.edu/postings/32462Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsCover LetterTranscriptsLetter of RecommendationCurriculum VitaeTeaching PhilosophyPastoral Reference LetterAcademic/Professional Reference Letter 1Academic/Professional Reference Letter 2Professional License(s)Optional DocumentsCareer Advancement Form (For Current LU Employees ONLY)Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*).last_img read more

Red Crescent Worker Killed as Ambulances Take Fire in Gaza

first_imgClick here to read full story. GENEVA — The international Red Cross revealed on Wednesday that a Palestinian Red Crescent ambulanceman was killed and two others were wounded after being hit during an Israeli bombardment in the Gaza Strip last weekend.last_img

New Machine Scrubs CO2 From the Air

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore University of Calgary climate change researchers say they are close to figuring out how to commercialize the capture of carbon dioxide directly from the air with a simple system that could be set up anywhere in the world. If they can make it work, it would allow greenhouse gas to be removed from ambient air and reduce the effect of emissions from transportation sources such as cars and airplanes. (Read the full story in CBC News) (Right- University of Calgary climate change scientist David Keith with his CO2 scrubber. (University of Calgary))  last_img read more

Gains in U.S. job growth expected, but weather may weigh

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by. Lucia MutikaniU.S. hiring likely picked up enough in February to keep the Federal Reserve on track in reducing its monetary stimulus.But the size of the gain is nevertheless expected to be modest as the economy struggles to break free of the grip of unusually severe winter weather.Nonfarm payrolls probably increased by 149,000 last month, with the jobless rate holding at a five-year low of 6.6 percent, according to a Reuters survey of economists.“Without adverse weather we could have ended with something above 200,000,” said Harm Bandholz, chief U.S. economist at UniCredit Research in New York.Nonfarm payrolls averaged about 205,000 new jobs per month in the first 11 months of 2013, but that figure dropped to just 94,000 for December and January as the unseasonably cold and snowy winter disrupted economic activity.With snow and ice covering densely populated areas during the week employers were surveyed for February payrolls, another soft reading is expected. continue reading »last_img read more

ADHD Drugs Don’t Boost Kids’ Grades

first_imgThe Wall Street Journal: It’s no longer shocking to hear of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder—and others simply facing a big test—taking ADHD medicine to boost their performance in school. But new studies point to a problem: There’s little evidence that the drugs actually improve academic outcomes.Stimulants used to treat ADHD like Ritalin and Adderall are sometimes called “cognitive enhancers” because they have been shown in a number of studies to improve attention, concentration and even certain types of memory in the short-term. Similar drugs were given to World War II soldiers to improve their ability to stay alert while scanning radars for enemy aircraft.…Martha Farah, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Pennsylvania who sits on the American Academy of Neurology committee that is drafting new treatment guidelines, recalls a student saying that after she takes her medication, she heads to the library. If she keeps her head down and studies, she gets very absorbed in her work and accomplishes a tremendous amount. But if a friend stops by, she becomes equally engrossed in the chat. Many students report they find themselves absorbed in cleaning their rooms rather than studying.Read the whole story: The Wall Street Journal More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

Observation of Emancipation Period Combines Commemoration, Celebration –…

first_img Six Eastern Caribbean countries deemed safe for travel – CDC Message from CARICOM Chairman on the 186th Anniversary of the Abolition of SlaveryI urge all in CARICOM to focus on reparations for the enslavement of Africans on Emancipation Day, 2020. In our region, and elsewhere, we need to have a more thorough-going public education programme on the meaning and significance of reparatory justice for the Caribbean. Further, our governments must ramp up…July 30, 2020In “CARICOM”Emancipation remains a work in progress – Chair of CARICOM Reparations CommissionEmancipation Day Message by Dr. Hilary Beckles, Chairman of the CARICOM Reparations Commission We join annually with communities across the world in marking the moment in which the crime of chattel enslavement was confronted and uprooted from our existential realities. For us, the moment is August 1st; other dates are…August 1, 2018In “CARICOM”CARICOM Reparations Commission boosts online presenceWelcome to the official Twitter Page of the CARICOM Reparations Commission. #ReparationTimeCome #BlackRights pic.twitter.com/asPVGeZAmX — Caricom Reparations (@CariReparations) July 20, 2016   The CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC) is becoming more accessible online as it seeks to boost its presence by rolling out a new website and new social media platforms via Facebook,…August 5, 2016In “Antigua & Barbuda”Share this on WhatsApp The observation of this Emancipation period combines commemoration and celebration – commemoration of the epic struggles of our ancestors on the mother continent Africa, in the Caribbean and elsewhere to rid the world of the scourge of chattel slavery. We are reminded that it took nearly a century after the abolition of the slave trade in 1807 before the final vestiges of this crime against humanity were eradicated in our region. We celebrate that achievement. CMO says Saint Lucia at critical stage of COVID-19 outbreak Oct 15, 2020 St. Lucia records more cases of COVID But this is not the end of the historical importance of this emancipation period. The British Emancipation Act of 1833 made the British government irrefutably complicit in the enslavement of Africans, for that Act recognized in British law for the first time, that Africans were chattel, property which could be bought and sold, property for the loss of which they paid enslavers. Oct 16, 2020 In the CARICOM region, 1st August 1834 is considered by many as the birth of the Caribbean. But it is again an opportunity to reflect on the issues associated with this birth. The CRC does not tire of stating the historical fact that the British government rewarded its planters, enforcers, investors and all others who promoted and profited from the enslavement of Africans with the sum of twenty million pounds – equivalent today of approximately two and a half trillion pounds. And further, that the debt the British government incurred to pay this sum, equivalent to sixty percent of its then gross national product, was not retired until 2015. This is important as it provides one of the bases for the CARICOM reparations claim against Britain. The assessment of the value of their chattel in the Caribbean by the planters was forty seven million pounds of which the British government could only provide twenty million. The remaining twenty seven million was paid to the planters through the period of apprenticeship where the former enslaved were forced to provide free labour to the plantations for the first four years of their supposed freedom. In other words, the enslaved paid with their sweat and blood more than fifty percent of the supposed cost of ‘their freedom’. In the Caribbean region, many will understand the phrase and interpretation of ‘put on put’. The case for reparations cannot be made stronger.center_img The CRC again wishes all a meaningful commemoration and celebration in this Emancipation period. Share this:PrintTwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:Like Loading… The CARICOM Reparations Commission (CRC) joins with all citizens of the English-speaking Caribbean and all others who understand and promote racial justice and equality in observing 1s August as Emancipation Day. We do this at a most important and inspiring time in our history when the Black Lives Matter and Reparations movements are sweeping the globe. We do this also while the COVID-19 pandemic is aggressively ripping the plasters from the sores of racial injustice and social and economic inequality in many of the societies in our hemisphere – and elsewhere. This period of celebration allows us all to bask in the creativity of our people, to recognize our contributions to world culture through intellectual pursuits, the arts and religion and sports and political organization – the barbarity of our past oppression, notwithstanding. The reflection must also provide the basis for the shaping of our future through development planning and the preparedness and commitment to build regional societies in which the challenges of poverty, poor health and education, poor housing and infrastructure are eradicated and our people are enabled to live the lives envisioned by those who struggled to make emancipation a reality. It is these considerations that prompted Sir Arthur Lewis, who we consider as the father of the reparations movement in the Caribbean, to forcibly impress on Britain that it has an unpaid debt to the region of two hundred years of free labour. It is that debt for which the CARICOM governments now demand settlement. Oct 15, 2020 Oct 16, 2020 More deaths from COVID-19 recorded in CARICOM countries,… You may be interested in…last_img read more

Chipolbrok Moon loads multiple cargoes

first_imgThe carousels were lifted in pairs using the vessel’s 320-ton (290.3-tonne) capacity cranes. As the tanks were wired together, the ship’s cranes had to be used simultaneously to ensure there was no interference with the connection, explained Chipolbrok.In addition to the tanks, 12 items of cooling equipment, each weighing 10 tonnes and measuring up to 13.8 m, were also loaded in the lower holds of the Chipolbrok Moon.The vessel is currently in Ravenna, Italy having called on route at Leixões in Portugal, where wind energy components destined for India were loaded. In Ravenna, Chipolbrok Moon is loading oversized cargoes, also bound for India.On the final leg of its journey, the vessel will be discharging cargoes in Karachi, Pakistan before calling at ports in India, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand and the Philippines.chipolbrok.com.pllast_img read more

Changemakers Hub brings people together

first_img About 50 children had an opportunity to paint, draw or colour a picture with a positive message. Volunteers were on hand to keep an eye on the children and to motivate them. 1 of 3 About 50 children had an opportunity to paint, draw or colour a picture with a positive message. A partnership between two organisations, not only ensured that children were fed a nutritious meal on Friday September 11, but that they also partake in an art therapy workshop.The Jill Fernandez Foundation, an organisation founded by Kurt Fernandez and his wife Rochelle, started a feeding scheme at the beginning of lockdown. The pair was introduced to Michelle Karevaar by Ward 50 councillor, Angus McKenzie. Ms Karevaar is a marketing strategist who founded Changemakers Hub, an online platform that highlights the work of charitable organisations and links them with people who would like to help.On Friday, about 50 children who regularly receive their meals from the foundation in Bluegum Road, had an opportunity to paint, draw or colour a picture with a positive message – thanks to Changemakers Hub.Mr Fernandez said his organisation wants to be much more than just a feeding project, hence it welcomes initiatives like an art workshop.“We want to establish a safe haven – especially for women and children in abusive situations. We already have social workers on board. My late sister, Jill, never had that opportunity. We learnt about her abuse when it was too late to save her. Part of our plan is also to establish a skills centre, and a place where children can come to for assistance with numeracy and literacy,” Mr Fernandez said.Ms Karevaar said she started Changemakers Hub as she felt that no stories were being told about “ordinary people doing great work”.“I work with people on the ground and give them a voice, but we are also focused on partnerships – bringing people together to make an impact. All donations we receive go out to the beneficiaries and we rely on volunteers. We also not only assist with food; it’s about love and light. I was in an abusive relationship and empathise with tough times. We need skills and tools to cope when we are faced with tough times, and today’s activity was all about positivity. We are trying to plant a seed to tell them they are their biggest heroes – so when things are tough, that bad words do not overtake our lives. We can choose to be positive,” Ms Karevaar said.Ms Karevaar was accompanied by Justine Schäfer, whom she describes as her accountability partner, and who made the donations for the workshop available.Mr Fernandez said his organisation is supported by a phenomenal team of volunteers, – which include family, friends and neighbours. They feed up to 400 people daily with porridge, and do a cooked meal as well every Wednesday. “Whatever donations we get, we serve the community with it. We have no words to express our gratitude to all those who support and assist us. However, we do need more donations to sustain our project,” Mr Fernandez said.If you are able to assist, contact Mr Fernandez at 078 850 9009 or [email protected], or Ms Fernandez at 076 0530 359. Zeena Slingers, 11, shows off the picture she painted.last_img read more